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Liquefied Gases-Prospects Toward the Year 2000

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000181725D
Publication Date: 2009-Apr-09
Document File: 4 page(s) / 132K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

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LIQUEFIED GASES - PROSPECTS TOWARD THE YEAR 2000

CHARLESDURR

   Technology Manager
The
]\tt W. Kellogg Company
Houston, TX

World Gas Conference Workshop outline

Berlin, Germany 1991

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LIQUEFIED GASES - PROSPECTS TOWARD THE YEAR 2000 BY

      CHARLES DURR TECHNOLOGY MANAGER
THE M. W. KELLOGG COMPANY HOUSTON, TEXAS U.S.A

TECHNOLOGY TRENDS

From a technology viewpoint, both the LPG and LNG industry would seem at first to be rather mature. However, despite the very significant technology evolutionn during the last few decades, there is still significant room for technology improvements. The intent here is to highlight some of the more important technology trends that will manifest themselves over the next decade. Since the LPG and LNG market respond to somewhat different market forces and technology challenges, they will be dealt with separately.

From the beginning of the base load LNG industry in the early 1960's, there has been a constant struggle to obtain the proper balance between safety, capital costs, reliability, and environmental control.

This struggle still continues but with the following trends.

Safety - While historically always important, there is a driving need to make LNG facilities among the safest hydrocarbon facilities in the world.

Capital Costs - Due to competition with other fuels, the LNG industry faces a very significant challenge; that is, to reduce capital costs to the point of being competitive while still allowing significant improvements in safety, reliability and environmental control.

Some of the trends to accomplish reduced capital costs are as follows:

• Larger liquefaction trains
• More efficient processing schemes

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• Fewer pieces of equipment
• Improved design techniques
• Improved storage designs
• Life extension of existing facilities

Reliability - There is an increasing need to design facilities for greater reliability and availability. Due to the very significant capital investment in the entire LNG chain (liquefaction, shipping and receiving), any breakdown in the chain has dire financial consequences. Also, from a more optimistic viewpoint, any increased production due to reliability/availability improvements potentially provides better economics to the entire LNG chain...