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Light Emitting Diode (LED) Light Source as Energy Source for Aquarium Entire Ecosystem

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000182059D
Publication Date: 2009-Apr-23
Document File: 8 page(s) / 3M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Nowadays, everyone in the world is looking for green energy and energy saving. The conventional light source is no longer popular to be used and it is going to be obsolete soon. This is the reason the Light Emitting Diode (LED) light source is becoming popular because of its energy saving and long life time. In addition to this, LED is also a halogen-free & mercury free solution compared to conventional light source e.g. CCFL & Halogen lamps. Conventional aquarium system is using fluorescent lamp as a light source for decorative purposes. However, due to its short life time and lack of flexibility to produce specific wavelength, which can be matched to special needs in the aquarium ecosystem, the aquarium system manufacturers are heading to replace the current light source to LED light source.

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Light Emitting Diode (LED) Light Source as Energy Source

for Aquarium Entire Ecosystem

by Poh Ju Chin, Oon Siang Ling, Felix Cheang, Gilbert Tan

Optoelectronic Product Division, Avago Technologies,

Penang

,

Malaysia

            Nowadays, everyone in the world is looking for green energy and energy saving. The conventional light source is no longer popular to be used and it is going to be obsolete soon.   This is the reason the Light Emitting Diode (LED) light source is becoming popular because of its energy saving and long life time.   In addition to this, LED is also a halogen-free & mercury free solution compared to conventional light source e.g. CCFL & Halogen lamps.

            Conventional aquarium system is using fluorescent lamp as a light source for decorative purposes. However, due to its short life time and lack of flexibility to produce specific wavelength, which can be matched to special needs in the aquarium ecosystem, the aquarium system manufacturers are heading to replace the current light source to LED light source.                  

Aquarium Ecosystem and the Activities

The type and intensity of lighting in an aquarium is very important as it affects health, stress, coloration, behavior of the fish, photosynthesis, growth of the plants, corals and invertebrates and stimulates reproduction.  Appropriate aquarium lighting that meets the requirements of the set-up will enhance the overall appearance and health of the fish tank.

Different activities in the Ecosystem need different types of lighting, for example:

·               Plant growth that work with blue and red spikes (red is especially needed for plant growth) which promote photosynthesis.

·               Salt water tank which needs blue color spectrum the most.  Ultra-Violet (UV) light promotes coral growth and proper photosynthesis in symbiotic algae that corals need to thrive.  This light is known as Actinic light

·               Low wattage LEDs that promotes normal feeding and reproduction in fishes and invertebrates.  It also simulates moonlight diffusion in water, creating a beautiful shimmering effect for optimal nocturnal viewing of the aquarium

Photosynthesis is the main activity in the ecosystem.  This process involves conversion of light energy into chemical energy by living organisms. The raw materials are carbon dioxide and water; the energy source is sunlight; and the end-products are oxygen and (energy rich) carbohydrates.  LED is able to provide full color spectrum light, which is equivalent to Sunlight.  This full color spectrum light is a perfect light for photosynthesis for plants in the aquarium, which is a significant process for the whole Ecosystem in the Aquarium.  Figure 1 shows the activities of the whole ecosystem in an aquarium.

 

 Figure 1: Ecosystem in an Aquarium

What is so great about LED?

A....