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GRI Scavenger CalcBase Resource

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000182776D
Publication Date: 2009-May-05

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

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Seventh GRI Sulfur Recovery Conference, 1995

GRI Scavenger CalcBase TM,

Resource for Scavenger

Comparison and Screening

  Gil Guillory (speaker) The M. W Kellogg Company Houston, Texas

and

   Dennis Leppin Gas Research Institute Chicago, Illinois

ABSTRACT

The use of scavengers by the natural gas industry has been growing significantly for removing low concentrations of H2S, where conventional amine treating is not economically feasible. With this growth, a keen interest in identifying better and more environmentally-acceptable H2S scavenging technologies has emerged. Gas Research Institute (GRI, Chicago, Illinois) has implemented a research program including technical evaluation, laboratory testing, and field evaluation to respond to this need.

A computer program is being developed (GRI Scavenger CalcBase), for commercial release in the second quarter 1996 that combines the GRI reports from this research program with calculational algorithms that allow the user to compare commercially-available scavenging systems on a cost basis.

GRI Scavenger CalcBase runs under the Microsoft® Windows™ operating system. The design algorithms were obtained from vendors of scavenger systems, and are based on the same equations that the vendors use for their designs. The output of the design algorithms are fed to a costing algorithm. The costing algorithm, written by The M. W. Kellogg Company (Kellogg, Houston, Texas), generates capital costs for the various scavenger systems on a comparable basis.

The program allows the user to view tabular or graphical results; compare cases side by side; print, save, and retrieve case data; browse through GRI topical reports on scavenging; and read scavenger vendor on-line brochures.

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Seventh GRI Sulfur Recovery Conference, 1995

INTRODUCTION

   The use of H2S scavengers by the natural gas industry has been growing significantly for removing low concentrations of H2S (typically up to about 200 ppmv H2S depending on the gas flow rate), where conventional amine treating is not economically feasible. For years, the Iron Sponge and other nonregenerable processes were widely used by the industry to treat these gases. Heightened concerns about safety and environmental impact associated with spent material disposal, as well as increased use of scavengers, have prompted the introduction and use of many new scavenger technologies. As environmental regulations have become stricter, a keen interest in identifying better and more environmentally-acceptable H2S scavenging technologies has emerged, generating a need for information on the application and performance of these technologies. In 1993, GRI initiated a research program in H2S scavenging spanning activities in technical evaluation, laboratory testing, and field evaluation (Leppin...