Browse Prior Art Database

Panic Button Customization on Physical Server to Trigger Centralized Policy Activity

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000183035D
Original Publication Date: 2009-May-12
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-May-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Panic Button Customization on Physical Server to Trigger Centralized Policy Activity

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

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Panic Button Customization on Physical Server to Trigger Centralized Policy Activity

Enclosed is a method that provides a method to define the actions that a hardware-based panic button would perform from centralized management software.

In modern computing environments, a physical server will most likely be participating in a virtual resource pool where, based on policies, workloads and virtual resources will dynamically be added, removed, and changed on the physical server. However, because these pools are managed using a software console, the administrator cannot quickly react to a hardware problem he is seeing in the lab floor. There needs to be a way for a hardware administrator to quickly suspend or alter policy activity on the physical server without needing to log onto a management console.

This method provides the ability to define the actions that a hardware-based panic button would perform from centralized management software. When pressed, the server would immediately tell the management software to perform those actions. The novelty is that the customization is driven and actions performed by the management software, yet the administrator can initiate it from the hardware itself. The panic button doesn't just suspend the server nor power it down without regard to the greater environment it is participating in. Rather, it communicates that the customized series of actions defined at the management software should be taken immediately thereby letting a local operator trigger actions specified in advance by a lead administrator or automated policy.

Additionally, the panic button could relay panic actions for specific hardware components embedded in the main chassis by using touch sensors. For example, if I am looking at a blade chassis and touch a sensor on blade5 then hit the panic button...