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Dual-Ended Solid-State-Drive for Enhanced Mobility and Broader Market Acceptance

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000183086D
Original Publication Date: 2009-May-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-May-14
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Solid state drives (SSD) comprising an emerging technology gaining acceptance in the marketplace because of (a) high storage capacity, (b) low power due to neither having a motor spinning disks nor physical seek arm moving an I/O head across the spinning disks, and (c) no seek time due to no physical seek arm. The core idea is to have two differing communications interfaces at opposing ends of the solid state drive, particularly for the 2.5" solid state drive, so the solid state drive could be employed internally in a laptop or notebook computer, or externally such as through a USB or PCMCIA port. Such a dual-ended SSD would offer even greater mobility than presently enjoyed by today?s SSD drives, as it could be used both internally and externally to the laptop or notebook.

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Dual-Ended Solid-State-Drive for Enhanced Mobility and Broader Market Acceptance

Solid state drives (SSD) comprising an emerging technology gaining acceptance in the marketplace because of (a) high storage capacity, (b) low power due to neither having a motor spinning disks nor physical seek arm moving an I/O head across the spinning disks, and (c) no seek time due to no physical seek arm. The core idea is to have two differing communications interfaces at opposing ends of the solid state drive, particularly for the 2.5" solid state drive, so the solid state drive could be employed internally in a laptop or notebook computer, or externally such as through a USB or PCMCIA port. Such a dual-ended SSD would offer even greater mobility than presently enjoyed by today's SSD drives, as it could be used both internally and externally to the laptop or notebook.

Figure 1 shows solid state drive 100 comprising body 101. Body 101 is typically thin stainless steel sheet metal bent or otherwise formed into a rectangular-shaped box which has an opening at each opposing end for first communications interface 102 and second communications interface 103. First communications interface 102 is either SATA (serial ATA) or SAS (serial attached SCSI). SATA is preferred for emulating hard disk drives in laptops or notebooks. Second communications interface 103 is different from first communications interface 102 and is chosen from the group of P...