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Cooperative Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000183809D
Original Publication Date: 2006-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Jun-02
Document File: 6 page(s) / 430K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Qicai Shi: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Wireless sensor network technology is experiencing significant growth. Integration of location capability into the wireless sensor network enables automatic localization of sensors anywhere in the area of deployment, significantly enhancing the network’s value. The combined abilities to sense, locate and communicate serve to open an exciting world of possibilities for the development of novel applications and new services. In earlier approaches to localization location estimates were assumed uncoupled and were performed independently. In wireless sensor networks nodes communicate with their peers, thus augmenting the amount of information available for location estimation. Cooperative location uses peer-to-peer range estimates derived from packet exchanges among neighboring sensors in the estimation of the node locations. In this paper we present fundamental results on the performance of cooperative location in wireless sensor networks including network estimation bounds and simulation data.

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Cooperative Localization Bounds for Wireless Sensor Networks

Qicai Shi, Neal Patwari, Spyros Kyperountas and Neiyer Correal

examine performance bounds of cooperative location in multi- hop wireless sensor networks. Related results regarding the CRLB can be found in [2,5,6,7,8]. The remainder of the paper is organized as follows. The cooperative localization problem is outlined in Section 2. General one-dimensional cases are analyzed for both single hop networks and multi-hop networks, and closed-form performance bounds are given in Section 3. Simulation results for multi-dimensional systems are reported in Section 4, concluding remarks follow in Section 5.

II. MATHEMATICAL FORMULATION OF COOPERATIVE

LOCATION ESTIMATION

 A sensor network with m+n nodes is illustrated in Fig.1. In this network, the positions of the first m nodes, called reference nodes, are known. The positions of the remaining n nodes, called blindfolded nodes, are unknown and need to be estimated. The localization problem is to find the unknown positions of the blindfolded nodes such as to minimize a pre- defined cost function and achieve sufficient location accuracy.

  Abstract-Wireless sensor network technology is experiencing significant growth. Integration of location capability into the wireless sensor network enables automatic localization of sensors anywhere in the area of deployment, significantly enhancing the network's value. The combined abilities to sense, locate and communicate serve to open an exciting world of possibilities for the development of novel applications and new services. In earlier approaches to localization, location estimates were assumed to be uncoupled and were performed independently. In wireless sensor networks nodes communicate with their peers, thus augmenting the amount of information available for location estimation. Cooperative location uses peer-to-peer range estimates derived from packet exchanges among neighboring sensors in the estimation of the node locations. In this paper we present fundamental results on the performance of cooperative location in wireless sensor networks including network estimation bounds and validating simulation data for several example systems.

I. INTRODUCTION

 Technological advances are making wireless sensor networks a reality [1]. A new class of sensing model emerges when individual sensors are endowed with the ability to associate to form a sensory network. In this sensing net, devices interact among themselves to achieve cooperative behavior. As a result, this networked fabric has the potential for gathering, processing and delivering information more effectively than a collection of independent stand-alone sensors. The traditional "single user" approach to localization is based on range measurements between a device and a set of reference devices placed at known locations. Thi...