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Automated Multi-up, Folded Imposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000184045D
Publication Date: 2009-Jun-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This idea proposes an alternate way to handle production of multi-up documents in a cut sheet printer. These documents would be produced in a manner that provides bindery efficiency without increasing job flow management complexity (including job accounting or job status). In a multi-up imposition workflow, pre-press and printing operations are efficient, but bindery operations such as cutting may not be. When a large number of cards (e.g. 4x3) are printed on a single sheet of paper, the number of cuts required to trim bleed edges and separate the cards can be large. This idea proposes an upstream or DFE (Digital Front End) resident tool that uses knowledge of available inline/off line folding capabilities to select new imposition and folding options to be applied to a job so that the resulting printed sheets can be folded, stacked and then finished with a minimum number of cuts applied in the bindery. The basic idea is to layout the print job to minimize cutting operations post printing. Applying folding and changing multi-up imposition enables more efficient bindery operation without adding prepress or RIP (Raster Image Processing) complexity and without impacting job status or accounting tools.

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Automated Multi-up, Folded Imposition

This idea proposes an alternate way to handle production of multi-up documents in a cut sheet printer. These documents would be produced in a manner that provides bindery efficiency without increasing job flow management complexity (including job accounting or job status).   In a multi-up imposition workflow, pre-press and printing operations are efficient, but bindery operations such as cutting may not be. When a large number of cards (e.g. 4x3) are printed on a single sheet of paper, the number of cuts required to trim bleed edges and separate the cards can be large. This idea proposes an upstream or DFE (Digital Front End) resident tool that uses knowledge of available inline/off line folding capabilities to select new imposition and folding options to be applied to a job so that the resulting printed sheets can be folded, stacked and then finished with a minimum number of cuts applied in the bindery.  The basic idea is to layout the print job to minimize cutting operations post printing.   Applying folding and changing multi-up imposition enables more efficient bindery operation without adding prepress or RIP (Raster Image Processing) complexity and without impacting job status or accounting tools.

Efficient production of documents such as business cards or postcards becomes problematic with increasingly small print run lengths. These documents can go through prepress and printing in an efficient manner, but efficient production in the bindery becomes increasingly difficult if not outright impossible. Current approaches to efficient bindery production of these documents centers on ganging. This, however, can be problematic as it increases complexity of job flow management from prepress through the bindery. Also, printing unrelated print jobs on the same sheet of paper makes DFE accounting and job status inaccurate since accounting may not comprehend ganging or the use of partial sheets for a single job.

This invention could be implemented as either part of a workflow automation product or as part of the DFE. In either case, this invention would target printers with inline finishing devices.

  1. In tightly integrated systems, the user would enable the automated folded multi-up imposition and specify whether the imposition would target specific inline device configurations or whether the system would target any configuration supported by the inline finishing device.
    1. The system would generally be able to determine information about supported folding options and the media constraints on those options.
  2. In systems that used less well-integrated devices, the user would configure the available folding options.
    1. The user would specify the folding types supported by the inline folder and the media sizes supported for the defined folding options. These would include typical fold...