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A pivoting and rotating mouse shell with a mouse base that can be parked

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000184311D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Jun-21
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Jun-21

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is pointing device hardware. While the hardware can be used like a traditional computer mouse, the hardware offers a pivoting and rotating mouse shell with a mouse base that can be parked.

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A pivoting and rotating mouse shell with a mouse base that can be parked

Disclosed is pointing device hardware. While the hardware can be used like a traditional computer mouse, the hardware offers a pivoting and rotating mouse shell with a mouse base that can be parked.

Some computer mice have pointing sticks or similar pointing devices integrated into the top of the mouse. In the disclosed hardware, the entire mouse shell itself is the "pointing stick". That is, an operator can pivot the mouse shell to achieve the same results as using a pointing stick. Operators may prefer the ergonomics of the disclosed hardware as the mouse shell fits more comfortably across the hand versus trying to move a pointing stick with the tip of a finger. Moving a pointing stick with the tip of a finger for extended periods of time can be strenuous.

The disclosed hardware also enables the mouse shell to rotate left and right. Rotation can support a variety of software functions. For example, increasing and decreasing audio volume, going forward and backward through web pages, increase and decrease display brightness, and zooming in and out of a picture. Also rotation can be used to set the sensitivity of the mouse. For example, at low sensitivity, moving the mouse one inch causes the mouse cursor to move one inch on the display. At high sensitivity, moving the mouse one inch causes the mouse cursor to move five inches on the display.

A traditional computer mouse requires a flat area to operate in. For example, an eight inch square area to the left or right of the computer keyboard. When the area is not available, operating the mouse can become difficult. For example, on an airplane fold out tray, space is very limited. The disclosed hardware enables the mouse base to be parked. In other words, the mouse base will no longer move freely across a flat surface. In one implementation, this can be achieved with rubber stoppers that deploy and retract from the bottom of the mouse base. When the mouse base is parked, the operator can pivot and rotate the mouse shell.

Example implementation:

In order to better understand how the disclosed hardware works, it will be helpful to see how it is assembled.

1) Mouse base with mouse cord sitting on a table

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2) Pointing stick (green) is added perpendicular to the mouse base.

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3) Mouse shell (blue) rests on the pointing stick. There is a four millimeter gap between the bottom edge of the mouse shell and the mouse base. This gap allows the mouse shell to be pivoted and rotated. The mouse button (yellow) is the triangle shape on the mouse cord end of the mouse shell.

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4) Regarding parking the mouse base, a mechanical button (orange) is located at the...