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Food Products Containing Soy Fiber

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000185368D
Publication Date: 2009-Jul-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Soy fiber has been shown to be beneficial to health. The fiber is linked to cholesterol reduction, prevention of coronary heart diseases, exercise induced stress, colon cancer, proper functioning of the digestive tract, and useful for weight management and obesity control. Sources of soy fiber of interest here are soy flour (SF), soy protein concentrate (SPC) and co-products of isolated soy protein (ISP) production. The objectives of the study were to develop soy fiber food products (crisps, snacks and breakfast cereal) from SF, SPC, co-product of ISP production, ISP and their combinations, and to evaluate the physicochemical properties of soy fiber based food products. The targeted soy fiber concentrations were from 0.5 to 40%. The soy fiber sources and combinations (SF, SPC, co-products of ISP production, SF/ISP, SF/SPC, SF/ co-products of ISP production, ISP/ co-products of ISP production, SPC/ISP and SPC/ co-products of ISP production) were blended with starch or cereal flour in an Eagle(TM) vertical blender for 15 min, and then extruded. The extruder used for the study was a Wenger® TX 52 Magnum (Wenger®, Sabetha, KS) with an L/D ratio of 19.5:1 and five heating zones. The extruder screw profile elements used for the study were 6-conveying, 1-conveying/compression, 2-3discs for mixing/compression, 2-compression, 1-3 discs for mixing/compression, 2-cut flights for compression/shearing, and 1-cone screw for compression/shearing. Each blend was fed to the hopper and conveyed to the pre-conditioning cylinder by the screw conveyor at the rate of 0.5 – 2 kg/min. The dry mix was conveyed by the paddles rotating at 250 – 300 rpm from the pre-conditioning cylinder inlet to outlet, with a residence time of 1 – 2 min. During the process, the dry mix was conditioned with water (0.05 – 0.2 kg/min) and steam (0.01 – 0.04 kg/min). The conditioned dry mix with a temperature of 40 – 50 oC was transferred from the pre-conditioning cylinder outlet through the feed trough to the extruder barrel inlet by gravitational force. The extruder screws rotating at 300 – 400 rpm conveyed the dry mix through the extruder barrel zones for shearing and texturization. The extruder barrel temperatures were zone 1 (50 – 60 oC), Zone 2 (60 – 70 oC), Zone 3 (70 – 80 oC), Zone 4 (90 – 100 oC) and Zone 5 (100 – 110 oC). Extruder barrel Zone 3 and head pressures were 500 – 1300 psi and 700 – 1500 psi respectively. The specific mechanical energy was 80–110 kWh/ton. The pseudoplastic material coming out of the twin screw extruder holes were molded into shapes and directly expanded from the die as it exits (soy fiber crisps 1x3, 1x4 and 2.0 mm; soy fiber breakfast cereal – rings or Cheerios®-type 3.0 mm ring die, pillows 1x4 mm, and pops 3.0 mm; and soy fiber snacks – expanded curls or Cheetos®-type 3.0 mm and waves 2x5 mm). The extrudates were cut into acceptable sizes with a knife (three or six blades), rotating at 800–3000 rpm, and pneumatically conveyed to the dryer (Proctor National Dryer(TM), Philadelphia, PA). The soy fiber food products were dried to 2.0 –6.0% moisture with a dryer belt setting of 4.0 – 6.0 and temperature of 260 – 270 oF for 15 – 25 min. The soy fiber food products had 2.0 – 18.0% soluble fiber, 12.0 – 35.0% insoluble fiber, 12.0 – 40.0% total dietary fiber, 10.0 – 40.0% protein, 1.0 – 4.0% fat and 2.0 – 5.0% ash. Soy fiber crisps had 0.150 – 0.270 g/cc density and 20 – 50 kg texture; breakfast cereal pillows (0.150-0.210 g/cc density and 2.0-4.0 kg texture), balls (0.05-0.15 g/cc density and 0.5-3.0 kg texture), and rings or Cheerios®-type (0.10-0.210 g/cc density and 2.0-4.0 kg texture; and snacks expanded curls or Cheetos®-type (0.05-0.120 g/cc density and 0.5-3.0 kg texture) and waves (0.05-0.115 g/cc and 0.5-3.0 kg). A variety of food products could be developed from soy fiber sources. As various changes could be made in the above process without departing from the scope of the process, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. Various modifications of the equipment, techniques, procedures, compositions, and materials may be apparent to those skilled in the art from the description of the process above. It is intended that all such variations within the scope and spirit of the article be embraced. The information contained herein is, to the best of our knowledge, correct. The data outlined and the statements made are intended only as a source of information. Also, we may suggest technical solutions for incorporating this ingredient into products; however, it is the user's responsibility to comply with appropriate government standards and requirements. No warranties, expressed or implied, are made. On the basis of their information, it is suggested that you evaluate the product on a laboratory scale prior to use in finished products. The information contained herein should not be construed as permission for violation of patent rights.

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ABSTRACT

Food Products Containing Soy Fiber

Soy fiber has been shown to be beneficial to health.  The fiber is linked to cholesterol reduction, prevention of coronary heart diseases, exercise induced stress, colon cancer, proper functioning of the digestive tract, and useful for weight management and obesity control.  Sources of soy fiber of interest here are soy flour (SF), soy protein concentrate (SPC) and co-products of isolated soy protein (ISP) production.  The objectives of the study were to develop soy fiber food products (crisps, snacks and breakfast cereal) from SF, SPC, co-product of ISP production, ISP and their combinations, and to evaluate the physicochemical properties of soy fiber based food products. 

The targeted soy fiber concentrations were from 0.5 to 40%.  The soy fiber sources and combinations (SF, SPC, co-products of ISP production, SF/ISP, SF/SPC, SF/ co-products of ISP production, ISP/ co-products of ISP production, SPC/ISP and SPC/ co-products of ISP production) were blended with starch or cereal flour in an Eagle™ vertical blender for 15 min, and then extruded.  The extruder used for the study was a Wenger® TX 52 Magnum (Wenger®,

Sabetha

,

KS

) with an L/D ratio of 19.5:1 and five heating zones.  The extruder screw profile elements used for the study were 6-conveying, 1-conveying/compression, 2-3discs for mixing/compression, 2-compression, 1-3 discs for mixing/compression, 2-cut flights for compression/shearing, and 1-cone screw for compression/shearing.  Each blend was fed to the hopper and conveyed to the pre-conditioning cylinder by the screw conveyor at the rate of 0.5 – 2 kg/min.  The dry mix was conveyed by the paddles rotating at 250 – 300 rpm from the pre-conditioning cylinder inlet to outlet, with a residence time of 1 – 2 min.  During the process, the dry mix was conditioned with water (0.05 – 0.2 kg/min) and steam (0.01 – 0.04 kg/min).  The conditioned dry mix with a temperature of 40 – 50 oC was transferred from the pre-conditioning cylinder outlet through the feed trough to the extruder barrel inlet by gravitational force.  The extruder screws rotating at 300 – 400 rpm conveyed the dry mix through the extruder barrel zones for shearing and texturization.  The extruder barrel temperatures were zone 1 (50 – 60 oC), Zone 2 (60 – 70 oC), Zone 3 (70 – 80 oC), Zone 4 (90 – 100 oC) and Zone 5 (100 – 110 oC). Extruder barrel Zone 3 and head pressures were 500 – 1300 psi and 700 – 1500 psi respectively.  The specific mechanical energy was 80–110 kWh/ton.  The pseud...