Browse Prior Art Database

USB Two Factor Authentication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000185607D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Jul-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Jul-28
Document File: 5 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

Linux Defenders

Related People

John Cronin: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

New hardware devices added to secure networks require authentication to verify that the devices belong on the secure network. When an administrator needs to add a new piece of hardware to the network, the rights and privileges for the new hardware must be validated, using a variety of authentication protocols. A Novel Methodology for Physically Authenticating a New Hardware Device is a new secure method for adding hardware to a secure network.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 30% of the total text.

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Contact Information

Publications@ipcg.com

ipCapital Group, Inc.
400 Cornerstone Drive, Suite 325
Williston, VT 05495
United States of America
(802) 872-3200

TITLE

A Novel Methodology for Physically Authenticating a New Hardware Device

ABSTRACT

New hardware devices added to secure networks require authentication to verify that the devices belong on the secure network. When an administrator needs to add a new piece of hardware to the network, the rights and privileges for the new hardware must be validated, using a variety of authentication protocols. A Novel Methodology for Physically Authenticating a New Hardware Device is a new secure method for adding hardware to a secure network.

1. BACKGROUND

Problem or Opportunity

Frequently, computers and networks of computers need to increase capacity or add hardware to accommodate user requirements. Due to the potential of interlopers to hijack unsecured hardware and cause damage to or interfere with the network, it is preferred that any added hardware is secured upon installation.

Typically a secure network contains a security system designed to prevent unauthorized access to said network. In order to add hardware to the network, a user with administrative privileges must verify the authenticity of the new hardware.

Currently, the process of authenticating a piece of hardware involves creating a communication network from the hardware to network (i.e. through DCP (dynamic addressing) or through a static IP address). Once the network is communicating with the new device, the network then prompts the new device for credentials verifying that the device should be allowed on the network. The network server or an authentication tool built into the OS then checks the credentials against the network permissions and either allows or denies the device's request to join. If the hardware is approved, it is added to a hardware control list which contains a unique identifier for all approved network devices.

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One limitation of this authentication method is the difficulty of adding hardware to a virtual network or via cloud computing. Additionally, while methods do exist to add hardware to virtual networks, they may not require two factor authentication ("As the name implies, two-factor authentication adds a second security method, typically 'something you have,' to the standard practice of requiring a password, 'something you know'"1).

Background Publications

Described below are systems and methods that attempt to provide a solution to the problem described above. These systems and methods are unable, however, to fully address the problem of authenticating the security of a new hardware device over a cloud computing network.

US Patent Number 5764890 describes a method and system for adding a secure network server to an existing computer network. The authentication process involves "connecting as separate nodes on a common communications link at least one...