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A Medical Image Viewer with a Smart Display System for Processing Tools

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000185622D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 9 Issue 8A (2009-08-14)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Aug-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 97K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

When visualizing medical images in an image viewer, a radiologist has various image processing tools at his/her disposal. The images can be displayed in different layouts. In a single layout, many different combinations of segments are possible where each one deals with similar or different types of data, for example, 2D or 3D image data, or data captured at different time points. The processing tools are dependent on the type of the displayed data. At present, processing tools are usually grouped according to their function to provide an easy access. Further, some frequently used tools are available as menus in the corners of the segment in which a particular operation has to be performed. These menus can be accessed by the radiologist by clicking the right mouse button and selecting a tool with the left mouse button. Each menu is represented by a graphic icon which is only visible when the mouse is located in the corner area of the display segment. The disadvantage of this solution is that the mouse movement from the current position to the corner of the segment may be time-consuming and tiresome depending on the mouse position and on the size of the segment. Besides, the graphic icons representing the menu reduce the viewing area of the segment.

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A Medical Image Viewer with a Smart Display System for Processing Tools

Idea: Bimalendu Gupta, IN-Bangalore

When visualizing medical images in an image viewer, a radiologist has various image processing tools at his/her disposal. The images can be displayed in different layouts. In a single layout, many different combinations of segments are possible where each one deals with similar or different types of data, for example, 2D or 3D image data, or data captured at different time points. The processing tools are dependent on the type of the displayed data.

At present, processing tools are usually grouped according to their function to provide an easy access. Further, some frequently used tools are available as menus in the corners of the segment in which a particular operation has to be performed. These menus can be accessed by the radiologist by clicking the right mouse button and selecting a tool with the left mouse button. Each menu is represented by a graphic icon which is only visible when the mouse is located in the corner area of the display segment. The disadvantage of this solution is that the mouse movement from the current position to the corner of the segment may be time-consuming and tiresome depending on the mouse position and on the size of the segment. Besides, the graphic icons representing the menu reduce the viewing area of the segment.

To provide a more convenient user control, a novel smart display system for processing of medical images is proposed. The idea is to bring the menu to the user. If the user wants to access one of the corner menus while analyzing the images in a certain segment, he/she has to use a mouse button or a combination of certain key and a mouse, and the menus appear around the current position of the mouse. Each corner represents the same menu that is available on the corner of the specific segment. This is illustrated in Figure 1 where a single display segment is shown. The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 at the corners represent the permanent menus attached to the segment. They contain all the image processing/analysis tools that are available for the layout used. The square at the center with 1, 2, 3, 4 represents the same menus when a preconfigured mouse button or a key-mouse combination is used. The mouse position is represented by B. A further example with four display segments is shown in Figure 2. When the radiologist places the mouse on one of the menus, the submenus become visible, and by clicking on the left mouse button, the tool can be selected (refer to Figure 3). Subsequently, the menu disappears.

The menus displayed around the current position of the mouse may be semi-transparent (like a waterma...