Browse Prior Art Database

System for use case panel analysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000187477D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Sep-08
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Sep-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 139K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Currently, there is no way for architects, information developers, product managers, etc. to see the big picture as to how the use cases and key scenarios designated for a particular product have been designed. A system is disclosed here where UI designers create their panels and provide some sort of identifier per use case panel. Other developers can then request data on the particular use cases and retrieve information around the visuals for the panels, how many panels, panel changes, terminology, and so on. Further comparisons are then possible for the analysis between one or more uses cases, where reuse of panels, number of panels, can also provide very helpful information. This capability might play well in the agile environment.

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System for use case panel analysis

Currently, there is no way for architects, information developers, product managers, etc. to see the big picture as to how the use cases and key scenarios designated for a particular product have been designed. There is value in being able to determine how many panels are associated with a particular use case at one time and to looking at one particular use case from beginning to end and comparing it from a consistency, efficiency, and concreteness perspective.

Likewise, there is no easy way, if at all, to compare more than one use case to another for any redundancies, inefficiencies, inconsistencies etc.

As resources continue to be constrained, aggressively pursuing a minimalism approach to designing and describing the way to get work done with our products is critical. Being able to visualize and view the big picture to see how the key use cases and scenarios are being addressed provides development contributors and stake holders with a much easier way to efficiently and effectively view and work on a product.

Figure 1 represents an example summary view of the results of this tool.

Figure 1

The user can see at a glance:

List of the use cases included in the project (or being evaluated) A high level complexity rating (user configurable)

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The total number of panels included in the use case


A description of the target use case (to help determine the appropriateness of the complexity level)

Additional fields can easily be included

Figure 2 provides an example of a comparison feature .

Figure 2

In this view the user can see:

A list of the use cases that have been evaluated


A high-level, graphical or iconic view of the number of panels The numeric total of the number of panels
A description
The ability to select tw...