Browse Prior Art Database

Injection ICD Screen

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000187934D
Publication Date: 2009-Sep-18
Document File: 4 page(s) / 431K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

as production ICDs when properly utilized. By counteracting the heel-toe effect in long horizontal homogeneous wells and balancing outflow in highly deviated and fractured wells, the injection ICD can lengthen the productive life of its partnered production well by reducing coning of the injection fluid into the production borehole. However injection ICDs, much like production ICDs, are susceptible to plugging and require some type of filtration method to clean the injected fluid. Current methods of filtering injection fluid are as follows. • Filtering fluid at surface, which does not prevent the transport of plugging particles found in the tubing string. • Installing small filters upstream from the ICD, which have a short life before plugging. • Installing large filters in the ID of the tubing string, which reduce tubing flow area and are prone to damage from completion tools. A new filtration method has been developed that has equal filtration area as standard production ICD screen and is installed on the OD of the tubing string to maintain flow area as well prevent damage to the screen during running of completion tools.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 1 of 4

Injection ICD Screen

Defensive Publication

Luke Holderman & Stephen Greci, Halliburton

September 16th, 2009

Abstract

Injection inflow control devices (ICDs) provide many of the same benefits
as production ICDs when properly utilized. By counteracting the heel-toe effect in long horizontal homogeneous wells and balancing outflow in highly deviated and fractured wells, the injection ICD can lengthen the productive life of its partnered production well by reducing coning of the injection fluid into the production borehole. However injection ICDs, much like production ICDs, are susceptible to plugging and require some type of filtration method to clean the injected fluid.

Current methods of filtering injection fluid are as follows.


• Filtering fluid at surface, which does not prevent the transport of plugging particles found in the tubing string.

• Installing small filters upstream from the ICD, which have a short life before plugging.

• Installing large filters in the ID of the tubing string, which reduce tubing flow area and are prone to damage from completion tools.

A new filtration method has been developed that has equal filtration area as standard production ICD screen and is installed on the OD of the tubing string to maintain flow area as well prevent damage to the screen during running of completion tools.

Page 2 of 4

Design

The injection ICD screen consists of four main components (Fig 1).

1. Perforated Base Pipe
2. Non-Perforated Shroud w/ Wire Wrap Screen Filter
3. Inflow Control Device
4. ICD Filter

Figure 1: Injection ICD Screen Layout

Base Pipe - The perforated base pipe is the exact opposite to a standard ICD base pipe. Instead of the perforations being located under the ICD they have been moved under the non-perforated shroud and screen assembly, much like a standard stand alone screen.

Non-Perforated Shroud and Screen - The shroud is an non-perforated sheath that surrounds the perforated base pipe. This allows for an annular flow path between the shroud and base pipe for injection fluid to traverse. A standard wire wrap screen is welded directly t...