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A Method for Effective Storing of Preservation Objects in an Enterprise Content Management (ECM) System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000188067D
Publication Date: 2009-Sep-22

Document File: 5 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

New business needs and legislation require sustaining content stored in an Enterprise Content Management (ECM) system for decades to come, and hence require defining and storing preservation objects in the ECM. The problem addressed by this article is how to effectively generate and store preservation objects in an ECM system.


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Long Term Digital Preservation (LTDP) is the ability to sustain the understandability and usability of digital objects in the distant future regardless of changes in technologies and in the "designated communities" that use these digital objects (that is, the data consumers). The core artifact maintained in an LTDP system is the Preservation Object (PO),

which includes the raw Content Data Object

preserved, Representation Information (RepInfo)

object intelligible to its designated community for decades to come, and additional metadata focused on describing the past and present states of the CDO, such as metadata to ensure the CDO is uniquely identifiable, its provenance and context, and ensuring it has not been altered in an undocumented manner. The preservation object is a dynamic object, and its structure and content may change over time; each such change may generate an updated preservation object which is considered a new version of the original preservation object.

    Today, the leading standard for LTDP systems is the Open Archival Information System (OAIS), an ISO standard since 2003 (ISO 14721:2003 OAIS)
[1]. OAIS specifies the terms, concepts and reference models for a system dedicated to preserving digital assets for a designated community.

An example of a

which is the basic

In the

ECM, there is generally the ability to define classes and properties for each class, that associate metadata and behavior to all the objects that belong to that class. Each object belongs to at least one class and all objects in a given class have the same set of properties, but the values of those properties may vary per each object. The ECM can obtain queries on the properties and process them efficiently. The IBM FileNet P8* product is an example of an ECM technology.

    New business needs and legislation require sustaining content stored in an ECM system for decades to come, and hence require defining and storing preservation objects in the ECM. The goal is to leverage existing ECM capabilities and make the storing of objects subject to LTDP as transparent as possible to the user - almost no difference between LTDP objects and non-LTDP objects. Therefore, the problem addressed by this disclosure is how to effectively generate and store preservation objects in an ECM system such that:

There are minimal changes in the existing classes and configuration in the

ECM - to improve usability


There is a small effort for the user who wishes to store his object for LTDP - to improve usability while lowering cost


There is sharing of RepInfos - to improve performance and scalability while lowering cost


There is maximal co-location and self-containment of the data in the file-system - to increase the probability for information sustainability

    The following is a methodology for effectively generating and storing preservation objects in an E...