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Pseudo-force functionality and enhanced gestures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000188151D
Publication Date: 2009-Sep-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Ethan Cheng: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

Measurement of a force imparted by an input object on a touch surface can be used to enhance the user experience by enabling force dependent gestures. For example, a gesture where a user lightly touches a point on the touch surface and then pushes harder at the same point to achieve some functionality, such as zooming or selecting an object around the point of contact. The techniques used to implement such a gesture may include a statistical recognizer that identifies a transition from a light touch to a harder touch or press. This recognizer may be integrated into a variety of different applications that would benefit from such a force measurement (e.g., a keyboard).

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Pseudo-force functionality and enhanced gestures Ethan Cheng and Patrick Worfolk

Pseudo-force functionality and enhanced gestures

1. Inventor(s): Ethan Cheng and Patrick Worfolk
2. Synaptics Incorporated, Santa Clara, CA, USA

3. Short Summary

Measurement of a force imparted by an input object on a touch surface can be used to enhance the user experience by enabling force dependent gestures. For example, a gesture where a user lightly touches a point on the touch surface and then pushes harder at the same point to achieve some functionality, such as zooming or selecting an object around the point of contact.

The techniques used to implement such a gesture may include a statistical recognizer that identifies a transition from a light touch to a harder touch or press. This recognizer may be integrated into a variety of different applications that would benefit from such a force measurement (e.g., a keyboard).

4. Some Problems Solved

Examples of some of the problems addressed by the invention include:

A touch input sensor that detects how hard a user is pushing makes available a number of interesting new gestures. The simplest of such gestures is the emulation of a button push - touch a button to select and push harder to activate. The integration of a true force/pressure sensor adds to the cost of a product due to both the sensor hardware and increased design complexity. If such a gesture could be recognized without the use of a dedicated force or pressure sensor, then a "pseudo-force" functionality could be added to a product by a software/firmware enhancement. This invention describes a method to achieve this.

Copyright © 2009 Synaptics Incorporated, All Rights Reserved. Page: 1 of 3

Information contained in this publication is provided as-is, with no express or implied warranties, including any warranty of merchantability, fitness for any particular purpose, or non-infringement. Synaptics Incorporated assumes no liability whatsoever for any use of the information contained herein, including any liability for intellectual property infringement. This publication conveys no express or implied licenses to any intellectual property rights belonging to Synaptics or any other party. Synaptics may, from time to time and at its sole option, update the information contained herein without notice.

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Pseudo-force functionality and enhanced gestures Ethan Cheng and Patrick Worfolk

5. General Description

An example of an enhanced gesture which could result from pseudo-force functionality is defined in the following flowchart:

START

Touch point of interest (with light pressure)

    Pause (finger stationary)

Increase finger pressure (finger stationary)

Maintain pressure as image zooms to desired size (finger stationary)

Decrease finger pressure (finger stationary)

END

Figure 1. A "push-to-zoom" gesture.

With respect to a...