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Browse Prior Art Database

Dockable Closed Captions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000189463D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Nov-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Nov-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

Microsoft

Related People

Wes Wahlin: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

Turning on captions or subtitles usually results in less viewable content in that the captions or subtitles themselves obscure the video being watched. Many times the captions or subtitles will move from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen in an attempt to block less relevant video; However, this usually results in your eyes needing to move up and down to keep track of the text. At best this is a poor solution. Also, it’s hard to keep up with fast speech. Most captions and subtitles can only be displayed 2 lines at a time. The user has no way to adjust this to either display more or less during these instances. NOTE: For broadcast content, the FCC mandates that captions must be supported. The FCC also mandates that they must be displayed in accordance with either a top or bottom descriptor. This patent supports this mandate.

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At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
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Document Author (alias)

Wwahlin; EBarsoum

Defensive Publication Title 

Dockable Closed Captions

Summary of the Defensive Publication/Abstract

Turning on captions or subtitles usually results in less viewable content in that the captions or subtitles themselves obscure the video being watched.  Many times the captions or subtitles will move from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen in an attempt to block less relevant video; However, this usually results in your eyes needing to move up and down to keep track of the text.  At best this is a poor solution.

Also, it’s hard to keep up with fast speech.  Most captions and subtitles can only be displayed 2 lines at a time.  The user has no way to adjust this to either display more or less during these instances.

NOTE: For broadcast content, the FCC mandates that captions must be supported.  The FCC also mandates that they must be displayed in accordance with either a top or bottom descriptor. This patent supports this mandate.

 

Description:  Include architectural diagrams and system level data flow diagrams if: 1) they have already been prepared or 2) they are needed to enable another developer to implement your defensive publication. Target 1-2 pages, and not more than 5 pages.  

The user will have the option to dock the captions or subtitles outside the Live TV play area; Either to the  top or bottom part of  the playback window (Eastern languages that are read top to bottom can be docked on the left or right be easier reading) or floating on the desktop. In this case, users can minimize live TV while working on their computer and still see and read the close caption text.  The experience in this case would be similar to current text tickers that most sports and News broadcasts use.

Also, when speech starts to speed up we’ll display each line of text for a reasonable amount of time which allows the user to read along and not miss any text.  When the text box is docked we’ll grow the text box dynamically to not obscure the video content and allow for easy reading in a reasonable amount of time.  As the speech slows down we’ll dynamic...