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A Method To Reduce Printing Material Consumption In Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000189504D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Nov-12
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Nov-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Printing documents that are dark in nature can consume a lot of printing material (toner, ink), while the user can be satisfied with a lesser quality (e.g., print in draft mode), or transformation, of the original document. We describe a method to calculate the percent of the paper that will be printed upon, and if it's above a threshold (usually 50%), print the document in reverse video, thus reducing the ammount of printing material consumed.

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Printing documents that are dark in nature can consume a lot
of printing material (toner, ink), while the user can be
satisfied with a lesser quality (e.g., print in draft mode),
or transformation, of the original document. For example, if
the document is very dark in nature and printed in black&white
(like in a slide stack I just downloaded and printed, which is
written white on black), it will probably remain readable if
printed in reverse video. Saving printing material can benefit
both the user (who has to spend less on printing material) and
the environment.

    In order to save printing material using reverse video,
the following simple algorithm can be used:
The document to be printed is transformed into a matrix (or
any other structure) of dots. When this structure is computed,
a sum function is applied to it, summing the total number of
dots to print. If the sum is over half the total possible
dots, the document is to be transformed, replacing every empty
dot with a full dot, and vice verse.

    This process could be interactive, suggesting reverse
video to the user, and letting him/her override the system
recommendation.

    This process can be done on a per-page basis, or per
whole document basis

    The process can also be applied selectively to a page.
E.g., if image areas are detected within the page, they can be
retained in their original configuration and not reversed.

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