Browse Prior Art Database

EMI Strain Relief Cable Clamp

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000190520D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Dec-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Dec-03
Document File: 5 page(s) / 415K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that offers cable strain relief at the electromagnetic interference (EMI) boundary while eliminating the need for EMI connectors.

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Disclosed is a device that offers cable strain relief at the electromagnetic interference (EMI) boundary while eliminating the need for EMI connectors. The design uses a modular approach to sandwich the cable between two identical pieces, which allows for pre-existing cable terminations. Three solutions are provided for EMI containment, and each of these proposals shall be securely mounted to a panel that acts as the EMI boundary.

    Space, cost, assembly method, and EMI strategy are important factors that affect cable selection and system layout. An existing solution is shown in Figure 1, where a portion of cable must have its sheathing stripped to expose shielding for the EMI clamp. Terminations and/or connectors cannot be assembled prior to feeding the cable through this particular device. Other various methods of cable mounting/grounding involve EMI connectors, which can be costly and undesirable. The forthcoming examples offer different techniques for achieving a similar result.

Embodiment 1

The featured cable clamp involves two identical pieces (Figures 2 and 3). Each piece consists of a threaded portion with tapered end, an array of pins/spikes that extend radially inward, and a flange for mounting purposes. The clamp may be secured on a cable at any desired location using a slotted nut, with no concern for cable terminations that would normally not fit through a closed diameter. As the nut is tightened, the clamping halves are compressed together around the cable. The spikes are meant to pierce through the outer cable sheathing, thus contacting the shielding layer underneath to ensure grounding contact. There is no need to strip sheathing from the cable ahead of time, and spike depths could change for different cable diameter...