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1-Nonene and its applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000191153D
Publication Date: 2009-Dec-18
Document File: 8 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Efforts to improve upon the performance of natural mineral oil-based lubricants by the use of synthetic lubricants has been an increasing trend in the petroleum industry for at least fifty years. This has led to the introduction of a number of synthetic lubricants into the market over recent years. The thrust of the industrial research efforts involving synthetic lubricants have been towards developing fluids that exhibit useful viscosities over a wider temperature range, (i.e. improved viscosity index (VI)), while also showing lubricities, thermal and oxidative stabilities and pour points equal to or better than those for mineral oil . One of the focus areas for synthetic lubricants has been the development of Polyalphaolefins (PAOs). A polyalphaolefin is a special type of polymer, which results from the polymerization of alpha-olefins. This family of molecules offers superior lubricant properties when compared to conventional mineral base oils. They are currently commercially produced by BF3-catalysed1 oligomerisation of normal -olefin monomers (1-decene being the monomer of choice), to form a mixture of dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers (with a minimal amount of higher oligomers). The dimers are separated from the higher oligomers, and the resulting product is hydrogenated for improved oxidative stability. Superior properties of PAOs are mainly due to the high degree of uniformity of the products .

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Fischer Tropsch based 1-Nonene and its application in Polyalphaolefins

By:

Tiffany Brown & Shailesh Maharaj

 


Table of Contents

1.     Introduction.. 3

2.     Sasol’s FT-based olefins. 3

3.     FT based PAO.. 6

4.     Conclusions. 7

 


1.  Introduction

Efforts to improve upon the performance of natural mineral oil-based lubricants by the use of synthetic lubricants has been an increasing trend in the petroleum industry for at least fifty years. This has led to the introduction of a number of synthetic lubricants into the market over recent years. The thrust of the industrial research efforts involving synthetic lubricants have been towards developing fluids that exhibit useful viscosities over a wider temperature range, (i.e. improved viscosity index (VI)), while also showing lubricities, thermal and oxidative stabilities and pour points equal to or better than those for mineral oil[1].

One of the focus areas for synthetic lubricants has been the development of Polyalphaolefins (PAOs). A polyalphaolefin is a special type of polymer, which results from the polymerization of alpha-olefins. This family of molecules offers superior lubricant properties when compared to conventional mineral base oils. They are currently commercially produced by BF3-catalysed1 oligomerisation of normal a-olefin monomers (1-decene being the monomer of choice), to form a mixture of dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers (with a minimal amount of higher oligomers). The dimers are separated from the higher oligomers, and the resulting product is hydrogenated for improved oxidative stability. Superior properties of PAOs are mainly due to the high degree of uniformity of the products[2] .

2.  Fischer Tropsch derived olefins

The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces a range of linear and branched paraffinic and olefinic hydrocarbons with carbon number range between 1 and approximately 100. These molecules may be used as components for fuels or as chemical feedstocks. Of particular interest for applications in polymer and lubricant industries are the higher alpha olefins such as 1-pentene, 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene, 1-nonene, 1-decene, 1-undecene and 1-dodecene.  Extraction of some of these olefins from FT streams is a commercial process practiced by Sasol in its Secunda operations. The olefins are currently used in several applications including as co-monomers in polyethylene production and as surfactant intermediates.

1-Nonene can be extracted from Fischer-Tropsch product streams. Higher olefins of this nature are typically applied as a feedstock for the production of linear alcohols, detergents and plastics. The FT process offers the unique ability to extract a significant quantity of C5 – C12 linear and branched alpha olefins for various applications.

Various linear alpha olefins are currently commercially extracted...