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TECHNIQUE FOR PROCESSING HIGH-SULFUR FUELS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000192648D
Publication Date: 2010-Jan-27
Document File: 6 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A technique for cracking and reforming of high-sulfur fuels is disclosed. This technique proposes a single cracking and reforming unit with combined cracking, desulfurization and reforming functions. A bi-functional cracking catalyst is employed. The bi-functional catalyst cracks the fuel and simultaneously converts most of the sulfur into hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and light sulfur compounds. High temperature sulfur adsorbents, such as MnO, trap most of the sulfur compounds. The catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) catalyst converts the cracked products into syngas. All catalyst components are packed or wash-coated into one catalyst bed split into two zones, a reaction and a regeneration zone.

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RP13294

TECHNIQUE FOR PROCESSING HIGH-SULFUR FUELS

BRIEF ABSTRACT

    A technique for cracking and reforming of high-sulfur fuels is disclosed. This technique proposes a single cracking and reforming unit with combined cracking, desulfurization and reforming functions. A bi-functional cracking catalyst is employed. The bi-functional catalyst cracks the fuel and simultaneously converts most of the sulfur into hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and light sulfur compounds. High temperature sulfur adsorbents, such as MnO, trap most of the sulfur compounds. The catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) catalyst converts the cracked products into syngas. All catalyst components are packed or wash- coated into one catalyst bed split into two zones, a reaction and a regeneration zone.

KEYWORDS

    Jet Propellant 8, JP-8, Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, CPO catalyst, syngas, H2S, bi-functional catalyst, desulfurization, cracking, reforming, high sulfur fuels, hydrodesulfurization (HDS), dibenzothiophene (DBT), adsorbents, sulfur oxides (Sox), catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) catalyst

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    Certain fuels that have a very high sulfur content serve as efficient sources of energy in internal combustion engines. Although such fuels are

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RP13294

attractive, the sulfur content is undesirable. Therefore, efficient removal of sulfur from such high sulfur fuels is critical. For example, the military logistic fuel Jet Propellant 8 (JP-8) contains up to about 3000 parts per million (ppm) sulfur. The Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell requires the sulfur level in reformate in parts per billion levels. For operation of the PEM fuel cells, JP-8 needs to be desulfurized using efficient desulfurization techniques.

    Conventional techniques for sulfur removal include use of traditional high pressure hydrodesulfurization (HDS) technology and/or use of sulfur adsorbents, such as dibenzothiophene (DBT), to trap heavy sulfur compounds. However, the HDS technology requires hydrogen recycle, high-pressure, and high-temperature operations that are very expensive and bulky. Further, the adsorbents technology is still under development stage. After the adsorbents are saturated with sulfur, the adsorbents need to be regenerated. The durability of adsorbents has not been demonstrated, and the regeneration strategy is not clear yet. Additionally, desulfurization and reformation of high sulfur fuels are generally carried out separately in separate reactors.

    As shown in Figure 1, the technique described herein allows cracking, desulfurization, and catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of high sulfur containing fuels, such as JP-8, in a single reactor. The technique employs a bi-functional cracking catalyst such as, for example, a zeolite + a CPO catalyst. All catalyst components are packed or wash-coated into one catalyst bed split into two zones, a first zone and a second zone. The first zone is a reaction zon...