Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Jan. 21, from 9am - 11am ET. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Method and System for Improving the Performance of Commands that Work across Multiple File Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000192785D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Feb-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a method and system for running a separate command on each file system in parallel to improve the performance of commands that work across multiple file systems.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Method and System for Improving the Performance of Commands that Work across Multiple File Systems

A method and system for improving the performance of commands that work across multiple file systems is disclosed. The method includes finding a starting directory and determining file systems that are needed for executing a command such as, a search command. The method further includes running a separate command on each file system in parallel.

Commands that work across multiple file systems take a lot of time for execution because of an increase in the number of files in file systems. An example of such a command that works across multiple file systems is the "find" command. As the find command searches the directory tree in a single threaded manner, it may take hours to get through all of the files.

The method and system disclosed herein allows the find command to run as a separate find command for each file system that needs to be searched. Thus, each separate find command runs in parallel improving the performance tremendously. Similarly, performance of any other UNIX*/Linux** command that is used to search through the directory structure may also be improved.

In order to run the find command as a separate find command for each file system, the file systems are determined using a "df" command. Thereafter, a starting directory is determined by breaking down options issued in the find command. Subsequently, the file systems that need to be searched are identified. A user may enter the starting directory in any format in order to run the find command as a separate find command for each file system. For example, the user may enter an absolute directory such as "/" or "/home". The user may also enter a relative directory such as "mydir" or "../../startdir".

The starting directory is converted to an absolute directory or a relative directory in order to match the starting directory to the mounted file systems. A built-in Perl*** function may be utilized to convert the starting directory into the absolute directory or the relative directory. After converting to the absolute directory path, each m...