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Transducer Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000193163D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Feb-23
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

An ultrasonic flowmeter comprises a measuring tube and at least one ultrasonic transducer placed in a holder with which ultrasonic signals are emitted into and received from the flowing medium. The transducer holder and the measuring tube are connected by welding. Currently, the transducer holder is a tilted tube which is welded to the measuring tube at an angle α across the tube. The disadvantage of this solution is that the welding is difficult to perform in the narrow space between the housing and the tube. Further, it is also difficult to drill the hole for the tilted tubular housing due to the forces on the drilling tool. These difficulties lead to poorer tolerances and, in turn to poorer repeatability in calibration (see Figure 1). Another solution uses circular holders that are welded at an angle of 90 degrees to the sensor tube. The circular hole allows for a rotation around the axis of symmetry. So, the welding becomes much easier, but the repeatability becomes difficult because only one degree of freedom is fixed (see Figure 2).

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Transducer Design

Idea: Soeren Meyer, DK-Nordborg

An ultrasonic flowmeter comprises a measuring tube and at least one ultrasonic transducer placed in a holder with which ultrasonic signals are emitted into and received from the flowing medium. The transducer holder and the measuring tube are connected by welding. Currently, the transducer holder is a tilted tube which is welded to the measuring tube at an angle α across the tube. The disadvantage of this solution is that the welding is difficult to perform in the narrow space between the housing and the tube. Further, it is also difficult to drill the hole for the tilted tubular housing due to the forces on the drilling tool. These difficulties lead to poorer tolerances and, in turn to poorer repeatability in calibration (see Figure 1). Another solution uses circular holders that are welded at an angle of 90 degrees to the sensor tube. The circular hole allows for a rotation around the axis of symmetry. So, the welding becomes much easier, but the repeatability becomes difficult because only one degree of freedom is fixed (see Figure 2).

It is proposed to use a preformed block that carries the transducer and fixes it in the right position using a "square hole". The use of a "square hole" fixes the geometry in two degrees of freedom making the repeatability better (see Figure 3). The block can be cast, machined or hydro-formed. Due to the novel form of the transducer holder, the welding can be performed automatic...