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LEVITATION OF A ROTATING RING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000193416D
Publication Date: 2010-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 109K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Rudolph N. J. Draaisma: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Several thinkers have argued that a disk or ring that rotates at high enough speeds, would become weightless and even could lift upwards from the ground. Indeed, there is an experiment, done by two Japanese researches, Hideo Hayasaka and Sakae Takeuchi of Tokohu University, who measured a slight decrease in weight on a high-speed gyro. As they could not repeat the experiment, but yet published the result, they became the laughing stock of the scientific world. Nevertheless, these are serious scientists, who would not publish a thing like this, if it wasn't true. From the following it will show how very true it likely was. The basic idea behind a rotating elevating ring is, that it simulates a satellite in gravitational orbit, in fact IS one, without being in orbit. Though this ring itself is not in orbit, every point on its periphery is. Lets consider a satellite in orbit, as shown in Fig.1. The satellite orbits the planet with a constant speed V. Seen from above, it looks as shown in Fig.2a Imagine more satellites are orbiting the planet on the same distance. Seen from above it can look as shown for six of them in Fig.2b. Of course, these satellites would collide with each other, going in opposite directions on the same orbit. However, if they instead would be slightly offset side wise, so they can pass each other, we get the situation as shown in Fig.2c, where the off-set becomes the diameter of a ring.

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LEVITATION OF A ROTATING RING

by: Rudolph N. J. Draaisma and Georg Duve
10 February 2010

THE PRINCIPLE

Several thinkers have argued that a disk or ring that rotates at high enough speeds, would become weightless and even could lift upwards from the ground. Indeed, there is an experiment, done by two Japanese researches, Hideo Hayasaka and Sakae Takeuchi of Tokohu University, who measured a slight decrease in weight on a high-speed gyro. As they could not repeat the experiment, but yet published the result, they became the laughing stock of the scientific world. Nevertheless, these are serious scientists, who would not publish a thing like this, if it wasn't true. From the following it will show how very true it likely was.

The basic idea behind a rotating elevating ring is, that it simulates a satellite in gravitational orbit, in fact IS one, without being in orbit. Though this ring itself is not in orbit, every point on its periphery is. Lets consider a satellite in orbit, as shown in Fig.1. The satellite orbits the planet with a constant speed V. Seen from above, it looks as shown in Fig.2a

Imagine more satellites are orbiting the planet on the same distance. Seen from above it can look as shown for six of them in Fig.2b. Of course, these satellites would collide with each other, going in opposite directions on the same orbit. However, if they instead would be slightly offset side wise, so they can pass each other, we get the situation as shown in Fig.2c, where the off-set becomes the diameter of a ring.

This ring is imaginary, but would become real if there are not six satellites, but as many as there are molecules in a mass ring of whatever dimension, each molecule being a "satellite". Of course, these molecules are no satellites then, because if they were, they would not be able to form a ring, but rather a circular hole in the imaginary spherical shell they would form around the planet (actually two holes, one at each of the two orbit- intersection poles of the shell). Nevertheless, these holes would be rotating at orbital speed (but in opposite direction).

However, if the orbits would be synchronized as such, that all molecules are in one of the intersection poles at exactly the same moment in time, then they would form a rotating mass ring there, but just during this moment in time, as they are moving on in their orbits, leaving the ring again.

Hence, a rotating mass ring, rotating at a given orbital circumferential speed, keeps all its molecules permanently in the intersection of there imaginary orbits. In other words, real orbits form imaginary rings - imaginary orbits form real rings.

The conclusion of this analysis can be no other than that a mass ring on Earth surface, rotating at any orbital speed, will tend to move upwards to the according height of that orbit. If that orbit is on sea level, the rotating mass becomes weightless - it sort of "floats" over the ground.

Calculations based on the common perceptions of po...