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Method for equipping "green" bags with an identification tag

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000193443D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Feb-24
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for enabling use of consumer-owned bags during self-checkout. The method involves issuing/providing an identification tag (e.g., sticker with a bar code, RFID tag, key card, receipt) that contains weight-related information about the consumer-owned bag. The identification tag would be used during future transactions to identify the bag and its weight, enabling scanning and bagging of purchased items without the confusion caused by the weight of the bag itself.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

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Method for equipping "green" bags with an identification tag

Self-checkout systems attempt to reduce shrink by associating a weight with a scanned product to determine whether the scanned product (i.e., not another product) was placed on the bagging module. When a different item is suspected, the self-checkout software stops the transaction until the excess weight is removed from the security module.

A current growing trend is related to the popularity of the "green" movement. Shoppers are now bringing their own bags to the self checkout. This causes a problem in that self checkouts today cannot accommodate the varying weights of these different re-usable, consumer-owned bags.

This article presents a method for enabling use of consumer-owned bags during self-checkout. The method involves issuing/providing an identification tag (e.g., sticker with a bar code, RFID tag, key card, receipt) that contains weight-related information about the consumer-owned bag. The identification tag would be used during future transactions to identify the bag and its weight, enabling scanning and bagging of purchased items without the confusion caused by the weight of the bag itself.

The identification tag could be attached in a variety of ways to the bags themselves (e.g., sewn in, printed on, adhesive, clips), or presented separately as a "weight of bag" printed voucher, or otherwise made available in associations with a bag during a checkout transaction.

Further, bags could be equ...