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Reducing Step Artifacts during Cardiac Exams

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000193775D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 10 Issue 3B (2010-03-24)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Mar-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Imaging is widely used in clinical diagnostics. To prevent motion induced artifacts, the movement of different organs of the examined region has to be assessed. For example, the intrinsic movement of the heart, the so called contraction, affects the coronary arteries. The coronaries may change their position up to five centimeters during the systole. In regard to volume imaging procedures the acquired data can only be mapped to a partial volume of the anatomic structure due to the movements. This leads to artifacts in data acquisition and reconstruction. The artifacts are also a problem for real time imaging which is used in cardiology. For performing interventional procedures such as trans-catheter implantation of aortic valves, real time imaging is used to visualize in detail the steps of the procedure. If a device is placed in a wrong spot, the consequences can be damaging or even life-threatening for the patient. For example, the coronary ostium has to be observed during the aortic valve implantation because of possible occlusion. Furthermore, in interventional procedures such as neurological procedures, the position of the patient is more upright due to possible shortness of breath. To register the motion connected to the respiration a so-called respiratory belt is used. However, the respiratory belt does not work for every patient and it does not indicate necessarily the real respiratory motion. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the belt movement and the diaphragm can not be deduced, in particular if the patient has a high respiratory rate. This fact can lead to an incorrect data acquisition during volume imaging using C-arm systems.

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Reducing Step Artifacts during Cardiac Exams

Idea: Sultan Haider, DE-Erlangen; Dr. Friedrich Fuchs, DE- Erlangen

Imaging is widely used in clinical diagnostics. To prevent motion induced artifact different organs of the examined region has to be assessed. For example, th
the heart, the so called contraction, affects the coronary arteries. The coronarie position up to five centimeters during the systole. In regard to volume imaging pro acquired data can only be mapped to a partial volume of the anatomic structure du movements. This leads to artifacts in data acquisition and reconstruction. The artif problem for real time imaging which is used in cardiology. For performing intervent such as trans-catheter implantation of aortic valves, real time imaging is used to vis steps of the procedure. If a device is placed in a wrong spot, the consequences even life-threatening for the patient. For example, the coronary ostium has to be o aortic valve implantation because of possible occlusion. Furthermore, in interven such as neurological procedures, the position of the patient is more upright due
of breath. To register the motion connected to the respiration a so-called re However, the respiratory belt does not work for every patient and it does not i
real respiratory motion. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the belt movem diaphragm can not be deduced, in particular if the patient has a high respira
lead to an incorrect data acquisition during volume imaging using C-arm system

Therefore, a novel solution is proposed where Ultrasound Imaging is combined wit electrocardiogram
window resulting from the ECG is enhanced by the additional U
diaphragm movement. Thus, in addition to the information abou
geographic dislocation of the aquired dataset is collected. In ca
a...