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Coil to Damp Mechanical Vibration of a Hearing Aid Receiver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000194857D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Apr-24
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Apr-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

In a hearing aid receiver, electrical signals are converted into sound to be delivered to a person's ear. The receiver is typically housed within the hearing aid case and acoustically coupled to a person's ear through a hollow tube. Vibration from a hearing aid receiver can be transmitted to the shell or further to the faceplate of the hearing aid. As a result, undesirable feedback from the vibration sensitive microphone contained in the shell or faceplate is produced. Currently, receivers of a bigger size are used to solve the mechanical vibration problem. However, this solution has the disadvantage, that the hearing aid gets also bigger.

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Coil to Damp Mechanical Vibration of a Hearing Aid Receiver

Idea: Hoong Yih Chan, SG-Singapore; Mo Choong Marie Chan, SG-Singapore; Wai Loon Ooi, SG-
Singapore

In a hearing aid receiver, electrical signals are converted into sound to be delivered to a person's ear. The receiver is typically housed within the hearing aid case and acoustically coupled to a person's ear through a hollow tube. Vibration from a hearing aid receiver can be transmitted to the shell or further to the faceplate of the hearing aid. As a result, undesirable feedback from the vibration sensitive microphone contained in the shell or faceplate is produced.

Currently, receivers of a bigger size are used to solve the mechanical vibration problem. However, this solution has the disadvantage, that the hearing aid gets also bigger.

It is proposed to use a coil, for example a wire with multiple loops around the receiver, to generate a flux that induces a vibration which is opposite in the direction but equal in the amplitude compared to the mechanical vibration of the receiver. This compensation vibration actively cancels or reduces the mechanical vibration. The idea is illustrated in Figure 1. The ends of the coiled wire are connected to a power source to provide an input current. The strength of current and the number of wire loops determine the strength of the negative flux. Additionally, a thin protective foil can be wrapped around the receiver and wire in order to protect the wire and to prevent...