Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Synchronization Mechanism applied to a Near-Line Storage system

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000194906D
Publication Date: 2010-Apr-13
Document File: 5 page(s) / 160K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Data access with a classical archiving solution is complicated, as the archived data must be brought back to the central system by an administrative process before read access to the archived data will be possible. For the particular situation, where one needs to archive data but still have online read access to the archived data, the concept of near-line storage has been defined. Near-line storage systems are usually installed on different, less expensive hardware, e.g. less expensive database servers and storage devices. The central system is usually the master, from which the data transfer to the near-line storage system is triggered. It is a challenging task to define a proper backup and recovery strategy for such systems with distributed data in order to avoid data inconsistencies after recovery from failure of the central or the near-line storage system. An efficient and safe method to restore a near-line storage system after failure of the central or the near-line storage system is proposed.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

Page 1 of 5

Synchronization Mechanism applied to a Near -Line Storage system

Companies are looking for alternatives to handle the increasing growth of data efficiently in order to accomplish their business goals. The common alternative "Add more hardware resources (processors, disk capacity and memory)" is not always the best alternative, because increasing hardware costs and reduced performance for query and backup processing are the consequences to handle large data volumes. For that reason archiving aged data to more price convenient resources while being able to have online read access to the archived data tends to be the best alternative at all. For this particular situation, the concept of near-line storage has been defined.

Near-line storage means that data are stored "near online". The data stored in the near-line storage system are less frequently accessed and read-only (in general). Data access with a classical archiving solution is complicated. The archived data must be brought back to the central system by an administrative process before read access to the archived data will be possible. In opposite, the archived near-line storage data can be accessed online without administrator intervention. This is beneficial to a company's operations, as the data is always accessible without the need to transfer it back to the online system.

In a usual customer scenario with a near-line storage solution, less frequently read-only data is moved from the central data storage to the near-line storage. In such a landscape the central system is always the master, from which the data transfer to the near-line storage is triggered. Near-line storage systems have usually reduced availability and performance requirements compared to the central systems. For that reason the near-line storage systems are usually installed on different, less expensive hardware, e.g. less expensive database servers and storage devices.

However it is a challenging task to define a proper backup and recovery strategy for such systems with distributed data in order to avoid data inconsistencies after recovery from failure of the central or the near-line storage system. In general both systems are running on different servers, which can have different system clocks. In such a case the recovery of both systems to the same point in time can result into data inconsistencies. A method is needed, which guarantees data consistency even though the servers run with different system time.

We propose an efficient and safe method to restore a near-line storage system after failure of the central or the near-line storage system. In addition we provide a method for data consistency check during the data access to the near-line storage.

The current near-line storage solutions available on the market concentrates mainly in the data movement and read operations, but no one offers an integrated solution to guarantee a data consistency after recovery of the near-line system.

In the following w...