Browse Prior Art Database

A method of detecting and fixing users' typographical errors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000195312D
Publication Date: 2010-Apr-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A program is disclosed with which typographical errors made by a user of a word processor are detected and fixed. Current auto-correction techniques are extended so that errors such as misspellings are corrected according to the user's history of errors and corrections. The program monitors the user's actions and infers mistyped words along with their corresponding corrections. The program constructs a dictionary of word misspellings along with the correctly spelt words. The dictionary can contain acronyms, names and numbers, as well as regular words. The word processor incorporates this dictionary into existing auto-correct and auto-complete features to provide more accurate functionality.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

A method of detecting and fixing users ' typographical errors

A program is disclosed with which typographical errors made by
a user of a word processor are detected and fixed. Current
auto-correction techniques are extended so that errors such as
misspellings are corrected according to the user's history of
errors and corrections. The program monitors the user's
actions and infers mistyped words along with their
corresponding corrections. The program constructs a
dictionary of word misspellings along with the correctly spelt
words. The dictionary can contain acronyms, names and
numbers, as well as regular words. The word processor
incorporates this dictionary into existing auto-correct and
auto-complete features to provide more accurate functionality.

    Common features of modern word processors are
auto-complete and auto-correct. The auto-correct feature
automatically replaces mistyped words input by the user with
the word's correct spelling. Current implementations of this
feature rely on a hard-coded dictionary in the application.
Current implementations require the user to manually enter
words with their corrections if they require auto-correction
for non-standard words.

    Drawbacks to current auto-correction features include
little tolerance toward unwanted replacements, along with no
capacity to react to repeated mistakes from a user which may
not be contained in the dictionary. Users commonly repeat the
same mistakes in typing words, yet if the word is not
contained in the dictionary, these mistakes are again and
again ignored by the auto-correction facility.

    The program disclosed here provides an implementation of
an auto-correction feature, which reacts to users' behaviour
and updates the dictionary of misspellings.

    The program persists a dictionary of word pairs, where
the first word in the pair is an erroneous word (such as
"dekstop") and the second word in the pair is the corrected
word (in the example given, "desktop").

    While the user is using the word processor, the
auto-correction program monitors the users' actions. When a
mistake is detected, the program determines what the mistake
was (for example, the user typed the word "dekstop"), and
determines what the correction was (for example, the user then
hit backspace 5 times, then typed out "sktop" to make the word
"desktop"). The program adds a tuple of the mistake word and
the correction word to the dictionary. (In the example given,
the tuple will be ("dekstop", "desktop")).

    During typing, the program behaves as a standard
auto-correction program would, correcting user errors as they
occur, by consulting the dictionary of error-correction pairs.
Since the user's actions are monitored by the program, any
time the user makes a mistake in typing a word that isn't
contained in the dictionary, this mistake will be picked up
and added to the dictionary.

Page 2 of 2

    Additionally, the program employs a feedback procedure.
If a correction is automatically applied by the program, which
the user then goes back and fixes...