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Hydrocarbon Surfactants as Wetting, Flow and Leveling Aids for Floor Polishes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000198166D
Publication Date: 2010-Jul-28
Document File: 8 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Recent discoveries regarding persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity have led to increased scrutiny of many fluorosurfactants by global regulatory agencies. Fluorosurfactants have been the dominant additive as wetting, flow and leveling aids in floor polish formulations for many years. Because floor polishes are ultimately removed and disposed to wastewater streams, and municipal waste water treatment facilities are unable to process certain fluorosurfactants properly, perfluorinated acid degradation products might be introduced into the environment. The presence of perfluorinated acids in the environment has become a global concern. As a consequence, there is a desire to formulate floor polishes using hydrocarbon instead of fluorochemical surfactants.

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Hydrocarbon Surfac

tants as Wetting, Flow and Leve

ling Aids for Floor

Polishes

E. Barry Bines and Ernest Hamp

OMNOVA Solutions Inc., 74

-

78 Wood Lane End, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

HP2 4RF, United Kingdom

Recent discoveries regarding persistence, bi

oaccumulation and toxicity

have led to

increased scrutiny

of many fluorosurfactants

by global regulatory agencies.

Fluorosurfactants have

been the dominant additive as wetting, flow and

leveling

aids in floor polish formulations for many

years

.

Because

flo

or polishes are ultimately removed and disposed to wastewater streams, and

municipal waste water treatment facilities are unable to process

certain

fluorosurfactants properly,

perfluorinated acid degradation products

might be introduced into

the environmen

t.

The presence of

perfluorinated acids in the environment has become a global concern. As a consequence, there is a

desire to formulate floor polishes using hydrocarbon instead of fluorochemical surfactants.

Floor Polish Performance and Regulatory Climat

e

Flooring substrates comprise a variety of materials and forms

.

F

loor polishes are true

coatings formulated to seal, protect and enhance the appearance of substrates onto which they are

applied. Floor polish technology is dominated by acrylic copolymers d

esigned to have very specific

utility

;

although

,

some

innovations, such as a new class of styrene

-

butadiene

(SB)

-

based

copolymers recently introduced by OMNOVA Solutions Inc.

,

have found commercial success.

Changes

to global legislation and environmental c

onsiderations require a constant review of

formulating ingredients.

This is true particularly to ensure compliance with a number of sponsored

programs such as the United States Environmental Protection Agenc

y's

"Design for the

Environment" and "Nordic Swan

" in Europe.

A floor polish formulation must satisfy several basic criteria.

The glass transition

temperature,

T

g

, of a polish copolymer must be low enough to form a film at room temperature, yet

high enough to impart mechanical properties such as black he

el mark resistance and robustness to

burnishing.

The effective

T

g

of the copolymer is modified by addition of plasticizers and coalescents

designed to optimize performance.

Furthermore, wax emulsions are usually added to the floor

polish formulation to aid

in final film

coefficient of friction

,

promote

durability and further enhance

the black heel mark resistance attributes.

Dried film mechanical properties ultimately

are

determined through non

-

covalent cross

-

linking

interactions between

an alkaline earth

metal or other divalent metal salt

and a functionality

on a

monomer used to make the copolymer

(e.g., acrylic acid)

.

This allows the floor polish to be

removed using an alkali solution to

eliminate

cross

-

links and solubilize the copolymer.

In addition to

m

echanical properties, a floor polish

must

provide good optical properties

such as

gloss and

distinctness of image.

Ultimately

, the

floor p...