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Energy Efficient Green Data Center Floor Based Thermal Cooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000198601D
Publication Date: 2010-Aug-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 469K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a concept utilizing floor-based cooling columns to provide efficient, system-level cooling in a data center.

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Current technology utilizes air or water to cool IT equipment in a data center. Computer room air conditioning (CRAC) is inefficient (cooling capacity per dollar), and current water heat exchangers have drawbacks (leak recovery, specific design requirements, customer acceptance, etc.). Customers do not like raised floors due to expense and problems with cable routings, etc. They do like conductive cooling wherever this is possible. Further density of IT equipment creates additional cost to produce and remove thermal load. The following concept utilizes a floor-based design to provide efficient cooling directly where it is needed.

    This idea uses a segmented floor composed of water-cooled islands, eliminating the need for CRAC units and creating a modular cool reservoir from which to draw the required amount
of cooling needed per rack or device. Because these discrete localized islands can deliver cooling directly to each rack, overall cooling efficiency is enhanced and cost is reduced. CRAC units also generate a thermal gradient throughout the data center, with lower temperatures close to the CRAC. CRAC unit-based data centers also commonly create difficult or impossible to cool hot spots. This solution would eliminate the thermal gradient and hot spots by delivering custom cooling based on the need of each rack in the data center. Depicted below in Figures 1 and 2 are graphics displaying thermal gradients and hot spots in real data centers. The gray boxes along the perimeter of the room are the CRAC units.

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    Illustrated below in Figures 3 and 4 are two views of the proposed solution. The first image is a side view of a water-cooled island. When a new system is required in the data center, a pillar of cement (or other suitable structural material) which is honeycombed to permi...