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Low-cost drive enclosure test card/method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000198602D
Publication Date: 2010-Aug-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 281K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that allows low-cost and high-coverage testing of active SAS hard drive backplane.

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Disclosed is a device that allows low-cost and high-coverage testing of active SAS hard drive backplane. The solution is divided into two sections: electrical and mechanical.

    The electrical invention consists of the active SAS re-drive, SAS wrap, power load, and voltage monitoring as shown in Figure 1 (dasd-wrap.bmp). The active SAS re-drive and support circuit (voltage regulator) are configured to pass data from SAS port 0 to SAS port 1 in both directions when the re-drive is enabled. The re-drive chip is only enabled if all three drive voltages are present and within margin. The design also supports up to 50W of static load. Both the voltage supervisors and static load can be configured to the particular application. Also present are status LEDs for operator reference and to aid debug.

    Since the SAS re-drive chip is disabled on any power fault, a simple SAS BIST (built-in self test)/PRNG (pseudo random number generator) can detect both power and signal faults. Most active SAS expander chips have hardware support for BIST testings. As such, the entire connector can be tested without invention by the operator or external connections beyond the product connector.

    The mechanical package is designed to be drop-in compatible with both 2.5" and 3.5" hard drive from factors as shown in Figures 2 and 3 (ojibway card drive asm

_sheet

_1

and 2.pdf).

Also, the number of mechanical parts in the assembly is minimized to keep production and tooling costs down. This was done by having a single molded plastic holder that the cards assembly snaps into without any retaining...