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Dynamic determination of interruptibility during online meetings based on characteristics of the meeting, level of engagement in the meeting and relationships between relevant parties

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199090D
Publication Date: 2010-Aug-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for dynamic determination of interruptibility during online meetings based on characteristics of the meeting, level of engagement in the meeting and relationships between relevant parties

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Dynamic determination of interruptibility during online meetings based on characteristics of the meeting, level of engagement in the meeting and relationships between relevant parties

Systems enabling realtime communications (such as instant messaging)

provide mechanisms to

control availability (e.g. - I am available, I am busy, DND, logged out, etc...). These are generally user-controlled, although some systems also provide either simple inactivity timing or enhancements via real-world sensors (e.g. - GPS location, motion detection) to enhance availability with additional criteria for physical presence or absence. Frequently, though, one's availability for interruption (interruptibility) is a more subjective measure based off various criteria. In particular, one's availability when occupied in a meeting (either real-world or teleconference) may vary depending on automatically measurable criteria around the properties of the meeting content (i.e. slides, screen sharing, no content) its participants (number, titles, internal vs external, roles such as vendor, customer,

partner, legal) as well as the actions of the

person being interrupted across a time dimension (I am speaking, I just spoke 1 minute ago, I

have not spoken once, I have spoken x percent of time of conference) and/or the properties of the

person looking to contact the recipient including its relationship in reporting structure to the

person being interrupted. For example, A participant in a meeting with one or two people may

people then the participant may

well be simply listening in and more easily interruptible. Likewise, a participant in a meeting with people from another company would likely be less interruptible. In addition, the initiator of contact may be in a management chain, with colleagues, from an external organization, etc... - and this may influence how "available"

participant may be to others. Current systems do not take

these factors into account or provide a method to tune awareness based on these criteria

Note - the two types of criteria here -

of the initiator (dependent availability) - may be independent ideas vs.

The method leverages awareness from associated software - meeting content/type, attendees from calendar, online meeting and teleconferencing software/systems as well as reporting chain and colleagues from profile or other systems which track "buddy lists" of colleagues. This information is used independently to determine the interruptibility (based on the number and details of people in the meeting) and availability (based on the contactee's relationship with the contact initiator). Either single piece of information or the combination can then be used to

provide a recommended handling to present a more complex availability criteria. This can be

handled by either having the presence server report the availability to each requestor or by reporting a single availability and then allowing requestors to obtain the specific availability for th...