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System for Enhanced Visual Media Presentation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199125D
Publication Date: 2010-Aug-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to spray droplets of water onto free space at high speed in a controlled fashion to be illuminated by a pulse of laser light coinciding at a given point in space. This generates the ability to ephemerally produce arbitrary three-dimensional objects in space that can then be illuminated to reveal the arbitrary scene to the observer.

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System for Enhanced Visual Media Presentation

Holography is the art that allows light scattered from an object to be recorded and later reconstructed so that it appears as if the object is in the same position relative to the recording medium as it was when recorded. Recent advances in holography have allowed the mass production of low-cost solid-state lasers, typically used by the millions in digital video disc (DVD) recorders and other applications, but which are sometimes also useful for holography.

While holography is commonly used to display static 3-D pictures, it is not yet possible to generate arbitrary scenes in space by a holographic volumetric display. This is because light needs something off which to reflect before it can be made visible. Some success has been achieved in generating arbitrary scenes inside a solid cube of translucent material of constant density and two intersecting laser beams. The laser beams creating an interference pattern when intersecting that is made visible by reflection from the translucent material. Scalability issues occur in relation to the procurement of the cube of translucent material and its persistency. Only a subset of the cube's material is used at any one time to produce the scene, and none at all when the device is not operating.

Engineers and designers need a method which results in the ability to ephemerally produce arbitrary three-dimensional objects in space that can then be illuminated to reveal the arbitrary scene to the observer.

Disclosed is a method to spray droplets of water onto free space at high speed in a controlled fashion and then illuminate them by a pulse of laser light coinciding at a given point in space. A two-dimensional array of water droplet emitters placed orthogonally from another two-dimensional array of laser light emitters, both attached to a control mechanism to achieve perfect timing of the two types of emissions can achieve the selective illumination of many droplets of water to create full three dimensional hologram in almost free space. Consider the dot matrix printing technique, whereby a two-dimensional image is reproduced on paper from a multitude of ink dots, and the ink

jet embodiment of that technique, whereby the small dots are sprayed onto the paper at

high velocity in a controlled manner.

At its simplest form, the concept being leveraged is the illumination of a drop of water as it falls to the earth. By timing a short pulse of laser light to coincide in space with the drop of water a dot of light appears in mid-air where they intersect. The concept is easily demonstrated through the aiming of a hand-held laser pointer to a dripping tap's water dropping to the ground (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Illumination of a drop of water

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Given that...