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NCG Handling for Fiberline Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199385D
Publication Date: 2010-Aug-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 190K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Ronny Adolfo Geiger: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

Competition has pushed suppliers to figure out solutions that are simple, easy to operate and cheap, but still reliable and safe. NCG handling system in Fiberline applications has been the subject of many discussions, especially when the matter is how to segregate the LVHC and HVLC gases.

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NCG Handling for Fiberline Systems

By: Ronny Adolfo Geiger; Aaron Leavitt; Marco Andrade

Competition has pushed suppliers to figure out solutions that are simple, easy to operate and cheap, but still reliable and safe. NCG handling system in Fiberline applications has been the subject of many discussions, especially when the matter is how to segregate the LVHC and HVLC gases. The eucalyptus kraft pulping system based on the Single Vessel Vapor Phase Downflow Lo-SolidsĀ® Cooking technology is the subject of this discussion. Aiming to minimize the amount of equipment necessary to safely manage the NCG gases from cooking, brownstock washing, oxygen delignification and screening, the technical alternative illustrated at the single-line diagram above is proposed. This cooking plant heat recovery system does not use flash tank technology, thus eliminates the major source of strong gases in cooking area, which is the flashing of the digester extractions. The digester top degassing line is continuously vented with fresh air by a fixed speed fan. The design of such dilution system is done so, that it will guarantee dilution of the digester degas at all time, to below the LEL (low explosion limit) of the gas mixture. The resulting gas from the dilution is then treated and managed as HVLC gases together with the HVLC gases from brownstock washing, delignification and screening.