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Optimizing Available Screen Real Estate on a Pervasive Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199407D
Publication Date: 2010-Sep-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method, system and computer usable medium for managing the display of content elements within a predetermined display area of a user interface. The system calculates the screen real estate (i.e., space) available to a mobile device user and provides either more or fewer activities to efficiently populate the screen.

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Optimizing Available Screen Real Estate on a Pervasive Device

An increasing number of individuals are purchasing smart phones and pervasive devices and taking advantage of the endless set of applications or "apps" available to them. With all the available options, optimizing the display presented to each user on their unique device is a challenge. The management of screen real estate (i.e., space) is the responsibility of the mobile application developers.

For example, in one set of devices, each screen is its own "activity". Having separate activities allows mobile developers to control what a user might see on any given screen. Developers must often create more activities than necessary to satisfy the many devices with varying resolutions. Another workaround is to create a scrollable layout which will cause the mobile user to see a scroll window when information flows out of the available view space.

The disclosed solution to this problem removes much of the existing pressure of real estate allocation from of the developers and places it onto the mobile device. A method, system and computer usable medium are disclosed for managing the display of content elements within a predetermined display area of a user interface. The components and process of the solution are as follows:

1. Content requests are submitted from a browser to a content server.

2. In response, the content server acquires candidate content elements for display within the browser.

3. A content element manager determines the dimensions of a target display area within the user interface (UI) of the browser.

4. The content element manager then determines the space required to display each of the candidate content elements.

5. Calculations are then performed to determine the maximum number of content elements that will fit within the dimensions of target display area.

6. Once determined, the content elements are selected and displayed in the display area.

The key to this method is that...