Browse Prior Art Database

Combined Production of Higher Alcohols, Ammonia and Alkyl Amines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199423D
Publication Date: 2010-Sep-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A challenge with the process for conversion of alcohols to synthesis gas is that depending on the process conditions, significant amounts of CO2 and CH4 are produced with alcohol formation. It is unlikely to avoid CO2 formation with the formation of ethanol due to the water gas shift reaction. To make the higher alcohol process more economic, we propose to integrate ammonia, urea, amines and alcohol production in one process (As shown in the following schematic diagram). Ammonia and urea are mainly used in the production of chemical fertilizer. Around 100 MMT/year of urea is produced by using CO2 and ammonia.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Combined Production of Higher Alcohols, Ammonia and Alkyl Amines

Alternative feedstocks, such as biomass, natural gas and coal have drawn a lot of attention due to the rise in crude oil prices in recent years.  More effort has been made to convert the above alternative feedstocks to value added chemicals, such as higher alcohols or fuels via syngas produced by gasification.  The choice of different feedstocks depends highly on the geographic location, for example, coal is more favorable in

China

due to the abundant productivity and cheap cost.

In the 1980s, The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed metal sulfide catalysts for the synthesis of mixed alcohol from syngas.  Dow and Union Carbide Corporation independently discovered that either supported or unsupported alkali-doped MoS2 catalyst could produce mixed alcohols from syngas.  As shown the following schematic diagram, ethylene and propylene are produced from alcohols by dehydration of ethanol and propanol (mixed alcohols) or by conversion in an MTO-like process.  

A challenge with this process is that depending on the process conditions, significant amounts of CO2 and CH4 are produced with alcohol formation.  It is unlikely to avoid CO2 formation with the formation of ethanol due to the water gas shift reaction.  To make the higher alcohol process more economic, we propose to integrate ammonia, urea, amines and alcohol production in one process (As shown in the following schematic diagram).  Ammonia and urea are mainly used in the production of chemical fertilizer. Around 100 MMT/year of urea is produced by using CO2 and ammonia. 

In this instance, the raw material is natural gas (NG) which is converted to syngas in a partial oxidation reactor (1) by reaction with oxygen.  The oxygen (O2) necessary for the reaction is obtained from an air separation u...