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HIGHLY ACCURATE SYNCHRONIZATION OF SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (SPECT) EVENTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199443D
Publication Date: 2010-Sep-04
Document File: 5 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A technique to accurately synchronize Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) events with position and gating events is disclosed. The technique described herein proposes utilization of the same piece of hardware to perform both positioning and gating tasks and provide a single data stream that contains the different types of information, perfectly synchronized from the outset.

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RP13483

HIGHLY ACCURATE SYNCHRONIZATION OF SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (SPECT) EVENTS

BRIEF ABSTRACT

    A technique to accurately synchronize Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) events with position and gating events is disclosed. The technique described herein proposes utilization of the same piece of hardware to perform both positioning and gating tasks and provide a single data stream that contains the different types of information, perfectly synchronized from the outset.

KEYWORDS

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), detector, collimator, synchronization, Data Memory Access (DMA) First in first out (FIFO), Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), event,

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a nuclear medicine tomography imaging technique which utilizes gamma rays. SPECT is similar to conventional nuclear medicine planar imaging which utilizes a gamma camera. However, unlike traditional computed tomography (CT) imaging, SPECT provides information pertaining to true three dimensional (3D) imaging. Such information is typically presented as cross-sectional slices through a

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RP13483

patient's body. But the information may be freely manipulated or reformatted as required.

    Usually, in order to acquire SPECT dynamic data it is required to obtain multiple views of a subject over a very short time period. In SPECT, mechanical motion of the detector and/or collimator is needed to obtain the views. Further, since the viewing position must be known accurately to reconstruct an image, a 'step and shoot' technique is generally utilized. However, an outcome of the step and shoot technique is dead time between views. Thus, if it is required to sample many angles quickly, the dead time becomes significant. However, moving the collimator continuously can help ensure that the position information is accurately synchronized with the event information.

    In conventional SPECT systems, motion control is usually separate from data acquisition, and the preferred mode of operation is 'step and shoot'. In the step and shoot technique, the motion module sends a signal to the data acquisition module conveying the information that the system has stopped moving and reached a target position. However, in a configuration where continuous target motion is attempted, data is synchronized by working from common synch signals and by bringing together different data streams during post processing of the data.

    Hence there is a need in the art for a technique which effectively ensures that the position in SPECT is accurately synchronized with the event information without any significant time loss.

    The present technique utilizes a single data acquisition card for detection of all relevant signals in a SPECT system. A RIO card 7833R developed by National Instruments is utilized which enables an interface with several devices simultaneously. Each device generates 'events' when cert...