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Browse Prior Art Database

Smart Tree for Drag and Drop Operation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199568D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Sep-23
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Sep-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

The usage of file tree structures in UI (User Interface) based applications has significantly increased. The advantage of such structures is that they can accommodate huge data with retaining their relationships by representing parent and child nodes. The use of file tree structures is facilitated by edit operations such as adding nodes to and removing nodes from the file tree, or altering the relationship between nodes. With the current Rich UI Applications these operations are controlled by drag and drop operations for a better usability. If a user wants to add a node to an intermediate node of the file tree, the user clicks and drags an object and hovers it with the mouse over the parent node so that it is expanded and the intermediate node becomes visible. In general, any parent node is expanded on a mouse hover, even though it is not the appropriate place for the object to move to. This causes unnecessary confusion to the user and is also wasting time by hovering over inappropriate nodes. This issue is partially solved by displaying a symbol to the user hovering over an inappropriate node which indicates that the object is not droppable.

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Smart Tree for Drag and Drop Operation

Idea: Karthikeyan Veeraraghavan, IN-Bangalore

The usage of file tree structures in UI (User Interface) based applications has significantly increased.

The advantage of such structures is that they can accommodate huge data with retaining their

relationships by representing parent and child nodes. The use of file tree structures is facilitated by

edit operations such as adding nodes to and removing nodes from the file tree, or altering the

relationship between nodes.

With the current Rich UI Applications these operations are controlled by drag and drop operations for a

better usability. If a user wants to add a node to an intermediate node of the file tree, the user clicks

and drags an object and hovers it with the mouse over the parent node so that it is expanded and the

intermediate node becomes visible. In general, any parent node is expanded on a mouse hover, even

though it is not the appropriate place for the object to move to. This causes unnecessary confusion to

the user and is also wasting time by hovering over inappropriate nodes. This issue is partially solved

by displaying a symbol to the user hovering over an inappropriate node which indicates that the object

is not droppable.

A file tree with an alphabetic structure as depicted in Figure 1 is assumed. As depicted in Figure 2, all

the inappropriate nodes are expanded if the object is hovered over them, even though it cannot be

dropped in any of them.

This problem can be solved if the file tree is smart enough to decide whether the object can be

dropped in any of the descendent nodes of the parent node currently hovered over. If the object can

be dropped in any of the descendent nodes, then the parent node is expanded else it is faded-out and

not expanded.

Again, a file tree with alphabet structure as depicted in Figure 1 is assumed. Furthermore,...