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A mechanism for environment monitoring using disposable sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000199993D
Publication Date: 2010-Sep-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This article describes a mechanism whereby a pair of sensors can be used to monitor changes in the local environment.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

A mechanism for environment monitoring using disposable sensors

Detecting when an environment has changed state is a common business requirement as the following examples illustrate:

A secure warehouse may contain a large number of crates each of which

1.

must remain in a sealed state. If a crate is opened the warehouse security team would need to be notified that a security breach had occurred and perform an appropriate action
Break pads on a car can wear down to the point where they are no longer

2.

effective and require replacing


A burglar alarm system needs to detect when a window/door is forced open

3.

and trigger an alarm

    
Examples 1 and 2 are typically dealt with today by periodic manual checks. This approach has many problems including the expense of doing the checks - especially if a certain amount of specialist skill is required, the amount of time taken and the fact that they may not be done regularly enough.

    Example 3 is typically dealt with by using having a circuit which is broken when the window/door is opened. However this approach may be problematic in certain environments such as listed buildings where installing the circuit is either damaging to the environment or impossible.

Each of the above can be solved by making use of paired destructible, disposable sensors such as RFID tags, located so that they can be used to detect a change in the state of their local environment. This is achieved as follows:

    One of the sensors (the permanent sensor) is located near to the environment in which it is desirable to detect a change but where the sensor will not get affected by the actual change that occurs. For example, on a particular crate The other sensor (the destructible sensor) is located in the environment in which is it desirable to detect a change. The sensor is located in such a way that any change in the environment will destroy the sensor. For example the sensor could span the opening flaps of the crate such that any attempt to open the crate will tear the sensor
A database is produced which consists of the identifiers of all paired (permanent and destructible) sensors
The database is made accessible to a device which is capable of detecting the presence of the sensors. If the device detects both of a set of paired sensors no action is performed. If only the permanent sensor is detected then an action is performed as appropriate
A corollary of this would be to have two sensors whereby only the permanent sensor is detectable until an environmental change makes the other one detectable. Again in this case the sensor monitoring device can perform the relevant action. This is achieved as follows:

One of the sensors (the permanent sensor) is located near to the environment in which it is desirable to detect a change, but where the sensor will not get affected by the actual change that occurs
The other sensor (the hidden sensor) is located in the environment in which is it desirable to detect a change. The sensor is locate...