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Method for augmenting incident-area radio coverage by FNE coordination of vehicular repeater resources

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200035D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Sep-24
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Sep-24
Document File: 8 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Simms, Matthew: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

One-line summary: The incident area is uploaded to the FNE where it computes and communicates new desirable locations or directions to VRS resources for optimal geographic placement to resolve radio communication coverage gaps. When a geographical incident scene is initially identified by first responders, it may include areas of marginal coverage. This can occur in urban terrain or mountainous terrain, or simply at the fringe of a normal coverage area. This incident area is created and shared between dispatch and first responder personnel via mobile terminals. This incident area is also automatically uploaded to the FNEs for coverage analysis. The FNE contains geographical and RF propagation databases and engines to evaluate where (or if) marginal rf coverage-areas exist. If marginal areas do exist that can be covered by mobile VRS resources, the FNE will suggest potential placement zones for those resources. These suggestions are further constrained by parameters such as distance, proximity to roads or trails, number of VRS resources available to the incident scene, and realtime incident scene subscriber feed back via Rssi/retry metrics. These suggestions are delivered to dispatch and the first responders via mobile terminal and additionally to GPS guidance devices, as a route, which is installed in the VRS vehicles themselves, possibly as a third party navigation system or built into the mobile terminal itself. It may be that the incident scene is completely out of the primary coverage area and the placement of VRS resources forms the most optimal back-haul between the incident scene and the primary coverage area. It may be that the incident area rf footprint also has CR traffic. The FNE may choose to use the VRS resources as the back haul, effectively blacking out CR traffic, or commandeer CR infrastructure placements as part of its route back to the primary coverage area FNE system. The FNE remains an interactive closed loop system for the incident duration providing updated information as the size and shape of the incident scene changes or as VRS resources are forced to move from their guided locations.

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Method for augmenting incident-area radio coverage by Fixed Network Equipment (FNE) coordination of vehicular repeater resources

 

By

Stan Jelavic

&

Matt Simms

Motorola, Inc.

EMS

 

ABSTRACT

Vehicular repeaters are designed to extend the radio dispatch communications footprint when users are in buildings or other marginal coverage areas.  In challenging urban or mountainous terrain, a correctly positioned VRS (Vehicular Repeater System) is a low cost and rapidly deployable means to achieve coverage extension.  In an unknown terrain and propagation environment, it may not be known how to optimally position VRS resources to serve the incident scene completely.  First responders may have the equipment to achieve communications for an incident scene, but without proper placement, may still have radio coverage gaps.  

PROBLEM

When a geographical incident scene is initially identified by first responders, it may include areas of marginal coverage.   This can occur in urban terrain or mountainous terrain, or simply at the fringe of a normal coverage area.  This incident area is created and shared between dispatch and first responder personnel via mobile terminals.   This incident area is also automatically uploaded to the FNEs for coverage analysis.  The FNE contains geographical and RF propagation databases and engines to evaluate where (or if) marginal RF coverage-areas exist.  If marginal areas do exist that can be covered by mobile VRS resources, the FNE will suggest potential placement zones for those resources.  These suggestions are further constrained by parameters such as distance, proximity to roads or trails, number of VRS resources available to the incident scene, and realtime incident scene subscriber feed back via Rssi/retry metrics.  These suggestions are delivered to dispatch and the first responders via mobile terminal and additionally to GPS guidance devices, as a route, which is installed in the VRS vehicles themselves, possibly as a third party navigation system or built into the mobile terminal itself.  It may be that the incident scene is completely out of the primary coverage area and the placement of VRS resources forms the most optimal back-haul between the incident scene and the primary coverage area.  It may be that the incident area RF footprint also has Cognitive Radio (CR) traffic.  The FNE may choose to use the VRS resources as the back haul, effectively blacking out CR traffic, or commandeer CR infrastructure placements as part of its route back to the primary coverage area FNE system.   The FNE remains an interactive closed loop system for the incident duration providing updated information as the size and shape of the incident scene changes or as VRS resources are forced to move from their guided locations.

SOLUTION

The system has an active role in providing coverage data to dispatchers and first responders.  It determines if coverage standards can be met for a geographically defined incident scene an...