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PROCESS FOR RESOLVING TRACTION MOTOR GEAR LOCK

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200102D
Publication Date: 2010-Sep-28
Document File: 6 page(s) / 123K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present invention relates generally to traction motors, and more particularly relates to a process for correcting improper meshing of a traction motor pinion and a bull gear. At least one shim plate is provided between each of the bolting planes of a u-tube and a traction motor in order to increase the distance between the u-tube and the traction motor and effectively increase the distance between the centers of the two gears.

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PROCESS FOR RESOLVING TRACTION MOTOR GEAR LOCK

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to traction motors, and more particularly relates to a process for correcting improper meshing of a traction motor pinion and a bull gear.

Locomotives, electrical multi-unit trains, such as subways and light rail vehicle trains, and some off-road utility vehicles utilize a variety of motors to operate.  For example, one type of motor used is a traction motor.  Typically these vehicles employ a large diesel engine to drive an alternator, or they are powered by externally supplied electricity. The electric power from the alternator or the external supply is conducted to traction motors located beneath a platform of the locomotive. The traction motors convert the electrical power to rotational mechanical power. The traction motors are engaged to provide tractive effort and braking effort, or in other words to drive wheels through axles. The rotation of the wheels by the traction motors drives the locomotive along its rails.  Specifically these motors are used to power the driving wheels of these vehicles by providing propulsion power to the wheels.  There is usually at least one traction motor on each axle. Figure 1 illustrates a conventional engine unit as described above.

FIGURE 1

Generally, each motor drives a small gear, called the pinion, which meshes with a larger gear, called the bull gear, on an axle shaft.  This provides the gear reduction that allows the motor to drive the train. Figure 2 illustrates the meshing of the pinion and the bull gear. As illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, the bull gear is provided on the axle shaft. The axle shaft sits in a u-tube, which is conventionally attached to the traction motor by bolts.

FIGURE 2

One disadvantage associated with traction motors relates to the meshing of the pinion and the bull gear. When assembled, the pinion and the bull gear must properly mesh in order to promote smooth rotation of the axle. In some situations, for example if the traction motor does not comply with design specifications, the pinion and the bull gear will not properly mesh. Improper meshing of the pinion and the bull gear may cause gear lock which prevents rotation of the axle. One technique that has been employed to resolve this problem has been to dismantle the entire engine unit and reassemble the unit to ensure proper meshing of the pinion and the bull gear. Additional efforts to resolve the problems associated with improper meshing have included attempts to remove the traction motor and install a replacement traction motor. However, it has been found that the results of both techniques are unpredictable and neither technique is consistently successful in resolving the problems mentioned above.

As a result, it would be advantageous to provide a process for correcting improper meshing between the pinion and the bull gear and to avoid the disadvantages resulting from removing and replacing or re-installing the tracti...