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Browse Prior Art Database

Generating "Interesting" Social Incentives to Attract Traffic to Online Polls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200263D
Publication Date: 2010-Oct-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The current disclosure is related to online surveys (polls), more specifically surveys that are conducted in social media web sites, such as Facebook (e.g., http://apps.facebook.com/realpolls/), My Space, Last.fm, etc. Social data adds a new dimension to online surveys, allowing the survey service to utilize user profiles or social relationships between users which may help in deciding which survey to disseminate to which user based on user similarity,

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Page 01 of 4

The current disclosure is related to online surveys (polls),
more specifically surveys that are conducted in social media
web sites, such as Facebook (e.g.,
http://apps.facebook.com/realpolls/), My Space, Last.fm, etc.
Social data adds a new dimension to online surveys, allowing
the survey service to utilize user profiles or social
relationships between users which may help in deciding which
survey to disseminate to which user based on user similarity,
Attracting users to participate in online surveys still
remains a challenge. One of the possible solutions to attract
traffic to online polls is through the usage of incentives.
Examples of common incentives that are used range from
promising to reveal the poll current results to the user once
the user participates in the poll, to offering the user
monetary incentives such as coupons.

Social media web sites such as Facebook also provide the user,
once the user participates in the poll, to view the selection
made by other friends.

Social incentives, if used correctly, could improve
dramatically the participation in online polls.

Though, such incentives are not utilized to their full
potential, and more sophisticated social incentive mechanisms
are required, which utilize all social available data to
maximize online poll participation traffics.

    Any implementation of social incentives must also
consider two important aspects which are

and the

possibility of survey bias.

Privacy preservation (e.g., keeping the identity of voters)
helps to maintain high discreetness even though social data is
utilized for the generation of social incentives. Revealing
addtional information provided by the social incentives may
hinder objective participation by users, which may result in
some survey bias. Therefore, any social incentive mechanism
should be able to minimize such bias, not to effect the
objective survey's results.

    The current disclosure utilizes all social available data
and integrates it with user poll profiles (to be explained
bellow) to generate "interesting"social incentives to users in
order to attract users to participate in online polls. The
social incentive mechanism utilizes differences in habits,
preferences, sentiments, etc. between different users and
their friends, and suggests interesting combinations of
friends that have already voted and which may attract the user
to participate in the current online polls. Privacy of voters
is maintained by annonymizing the identity of users that
already voted in the system prior to current user poll
participation. Bias in poll results is minimized using survey
bias minimization techniques (e.g., via control survey
groups).

    As a preliminary assumption, we assume a mechanism
(disclosed by prior-arts on ad dissemination, etc) which given

privacy



Page 02 of 4

an online poll can select users to disseminate the poll based

on their user profile, current content (e.g., page content),
similarity to other users that took the poll already,
influence and representativeness in the social networ...