Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Improved Power-Up Performance for Radios with Large Contact List

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200289D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Oct-04
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Oct-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 234K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Ley, David: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

Contact Lists for two-way radio systems must store a large amount of data in order to accommodate many different types of radio IDs for a large number of users. The amount of data that must then be loaded can negatively impact the power up performance of a two-way radio. In order to improve the power-up performance of the radio, a method for optimizing the contact data storage based on which contacts are most frequently used was developed. Based on other information stored in the radio, the radio can cache, or store separately, the set of call list data most likely to be used. By caching a subset of the data, this allows faster power up times by loading immediately the most likely to be used information. The rest of the contact data can then be loaded in the background as time permits.

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Method for Improved Power-Up Performance for Radios with Large Contact List

 

By David Ley, Don Phelps, Miriam Cohen

Motorola, Inc.

G&PS

 

ABSTRACT

Contact Lists for two-way radio systems must store a large amount of data in order to accommodate many different types of radio IDs for a large number of users.  The amount of data that must then be loaded can negatively impact the power up performance of a two-way radio.

In order to improve the power-up performance of the radio, a method for optimizing the contact data storage based on which contacts are most frequently used was developed. Based on other information stored in the radio, the radio can cache, or store separately, the set of call list data most likely to be used.

By caching a subset of the data, this allows faster power up times by loading immediately the most likely to be used information. The rest of the contact data can then be loaded in the background as time permits.

PROBLEM

Public Safety products are incorporating more of the personal hand held device user interface aspects to them. For example, newer two-way radios now use “contact” lists as a means of calling or paging another two-way radio. However, as this transition is occurring, the scalability of the contacts feature has a big impact on performance. 

For the description below the following terms will be used:

Contact – An entry in the list which represents a person.

Contact Number – A number associated with the contact, used to phone call, private call, page or text the person.

Contact Data – The alias or text associated with the Contact, plus the Contact Numbers.

Two-way radios have to support more than just “personal” contacts. For example, in Motorola’s APX product line, the radio supports enough contacts to handle a state-wide or nation-wide system. This allows two-way radios to be deployed with the same set of contacts to large groups of users. In addition to the number of contacts, it also must support up to 10 contact numbers per contact. This allows users to be on multiple systems for interoperability and multiple signaling types.

All of this creates a large amount of contact data that needs to be stored in the two-way radio device. This data is generally stored in the flash part, or on an external memory card. Increasing the size of memory and the number of blocks of data to store all of this contact information has a negative impact on performance, specifically power up times.  When data is stored in these types (or any types) of memory, you need some sort of memory management to handle reading, writing and erasing the memory part. Typical memory management algorithms scan through the memory to find the blocks of data and validate them. This memory validation can take a considerable amount of time at power up.

Motorola two-way radios have power up times on the order of 2-3 seconds. This publication describes a method for intelligently storing the Contact...