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Collision Avoidance System for a Multi-Mobile C-arm

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200572D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Oct-19
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Oct-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 262K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Mobile imaging C-arm systems are able to capture optimal images of the human anatomy at any desired orientation. However, the flexibility of the C-arm systems can cause collisions between moving objects around the C-arm. If not used by an operator correctly, it can collide with stationary or moving objects. Current solutions to prevent such collisions are mostly patient based solutions. However, there are often other moving objects. In the following it is proposed that a set of TOF cameras is used to allow a distance and position detection of objects within the space volume of the C-arm system (TOF: Time Of Flight). This type of cameras creates distance data by using the so called time-of-flight principle. The resolution of the TOF cameras is better than most of the current used depth map sensors and they are not affected by any illumination changes. A preferred embodiment proposes two 360 degree TOF cameras at the C-arc to scan a maximum area with a minimum number of cameras. A third camera positioned in a top view captures all constraining objects in the moving area of the C-arm. These cameras enable the use of a software based application to prevent any C-arm collisions.

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Collision Avoidance System for a Multi-Mobile C-arm

Idea: Varun Akur Venkatesan, IN-Bangalore; Antony Louis Piriyakumar Douglas, IN-Bangalore

Mobile imaging C-arm systems are able to capture optimal images of the human anatomy at any desired orientation. However, the flexibility of the C-arm systems can cause collisions between moving objects around the C-arm. If not used by an operator correctly, it can collide with stationary or moving objects. Current solutions to prevent such collisions are mostly patient based solutions. However, there are often other moving objects.

In the following it is proposed that a set of TOF cameras is used to allow a distance and position detection of objects within the space volume of the C-arm system (TOF: Time Of Flight). This type of cameras creates distance data by using the so called time-of-flight principle. The resolution of the TOF cameras is better than most of the current used depth map sensors and they are not affected by any illumination changes. A preferred embodiment proposes two 360 degree TOF cameras at the C-arc to scan a maximum area with a minimum number of cameras. A third camera positioned in a top view captures all constraining objects in the moving area of the C-arm. These cameras enable the use of a software based application to prevent any C-arm collisions.

A typical image from a TOF camera is exemplary given in Figure 1. Closer objects are depicted brighter than the ones in the background. A precise estimation of the depth at every point is obtained as seen from the camera's view point. If the camera system detects a critical object, an alarm can raise and/or the system will stop moving.

The components of the C-arm that need to be covered by the TOF cameras are shown in Figure 2. The C-arm has one portion C3 connected to the base C1 at the joint C2 and another portion C5 connected to the C-arc C6. C7 depicts the housing of the X-ray equipment (source and detector) which is moved and rotat...