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Printing via GPS location

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200841D
Publication Date: 2010-Oct-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This idea proposes registering Multifunction Printers (MFP) by Global Positioning System (GPS) location such that they appear as icons on mapping software similar to Google Maps™. Users could then select a location and the application would find the closest printer with the required capabilities. The intent is to provide users with the ability to easily identify, and subsequently submit jobs to printers close to targeted destinations that have the capabilities required to produce their job. To achieve this, printers would either self-register via a built-in GPS or an individual print shop could manually register them. Users would be able to specify a target location along with their printing requirements and, through a printer vendor mapping website, find a qualified printer close to that location. The user could then submit the job to the related print shop using standard methods. An alternate scenario is to submit a job previously tagged with GPS data to the printer mapping website and the application would parse the GPS data from the job and return print location recommendations.

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Printing via GPS location

This idea proposes registering Multifunction Printers (MFP) by Global Positioning System (GPS) location such that they appear as icons on mapping software similar to Google Maps™.   Users could then select a location and the application would find the closest printer with the required capabilities. The intent is to provide users with the ability to easily identify, and subsequently submit jobs to printers close to targeted destinations that have the capabilities required to produce their job. To achieve this, printers would either self-register via a built-in GPS or an individual print shop could manually register them. Users would be able to specify a target location along with their printing requirements and, through a printer vendor mapping website, find a qualified printer close to that location. The user could then submit the job to the related print shop using standard methods. An alternate scenario is to submit a job previously tagged with GPS data to the printer mapping website and the application would parse the GPS data from the job and return print location recommendations.

This proposal is based on the belief that printing to GPS location can be a very powerful and time saving tool in today's world. It is not hard to imagine that since two printers can’t occupy the same physical space, that GPS data could even replace the Internet Protocol (IP) address.

The proposal has three basic tenets, which are as follows:

1) A user may wish to be able to bring up the printer mapping website on their browser and locate all printers of a particular type in a given area. An icon representing the printer would be superimposed on the map in the appropriate location.  Of course this would require that printers be registered (either by themselves via a built in GPS or manually by the owner of the print shop). In either case the print shop owner would have to agree for the printer to be registered and may have to pay the vendor a fee to have their printers show up on the printer mapping system. This would give users the ability to search for a print location on the printer mapping website and to view a map with printer icons at the available locations. Rolling over the scan/print icons would produce detailed information about each printer and its capabilities. The user would also be able to right click on any of the icons and submit his document directly or contact the print shop by email.

Of course it would be desirable to support the aforementioned printer mapping capabilities with mobile digital devices (iPhone®, Android™, etc.).   Handheld mobile devices could add a menu item which leverages the built in GPS to display print locations within an X mile radius of the user’s location.  For example, a user may want to print presentation handouts in color as a signature booklet.  The us...