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Productively utilizing waste from printing trimmings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000200998D
Publication Date: 2010-Nov-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

With many of the books printed on demand by an On Demand Bookmaker, there is a large amount of waste/scrap paper generated which is neither "green" nor does it provide any value to the customer of the book or the printing provider. This idea proposes to use the digital front end (DFE), the printing of the book pages, the user interface, and stepped trimming to create a product of some value, real or perceived, either to the book customer or the print provider (i.e. college book store).

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Productively utilizing waste from printing trimmings

With many of the books printed on demand by an On Demand Bookmaker, there is a large amount of waste/scrap paper generated which is neither “green” nor does it provide any value to the customer of the book or the printing provider.  This idea proposes to use the digital front end (DFE), the printing of the book pages, the user interface, and stepped trimming to create a product of some value, real or perceived, either to the book customer or the print provider (i.e. college book store).

When a title is selected the printer or business owner would offer or print for themselves from a selection of available options the surrounding page space that would normally be trimmed off and discarded. This could range from a child’s

“flip book”, a book of coupons to the store, simple poetry, cartoons, slogans, trivia questions, quotations, puzzles, Sudoku puzzles, Chinese fortunes, astrological fortunes, and others.  Reasonable candidates are anything that might have value or perceived value to the customer. The logic of the front end combined with the knowledge of the sheet size and the coverage, would determine which of the complimentary products would be available. The options would show on the user interface and be chosen. If the space was insufficient, then the machine would not offer any options.

Imagine a college bookstore printing coupons to the local pizza place or club in addition to a student’s book, or “prin...