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MRI Temperature Monitoring for Renal Nerve Ablation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000201042D
Publication Date: 2010-Nov-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The invention is apparatus and methods for guiding RF energy through the renal artery to the perivascular nerves without thermal injury to the artery. A deployment catheter places a number of small conductive guides in the wall like rivets; the rivets have a good electrical conductor to pass RF or other electrical energy from a treatment catheter in the artery to a target zone outside the artery. The guides can have poorly conductive polymeric securement pads with a good conductor passing through the center, with an insulating outer layer to prevent energy passage directly into the artery wall along the guide. After securing a number of these energy guides, a treatment catheter delivers energy to the luminal end of the guides. The energy passes through the good conductor and passes into the perivascular tissue where renal nerves are located. The high current density ablates the renal nerves, while the artery tissue is largely unaffected. The treatment catheter can transmit energy to the guides by direct contact or by capacitive coupling, allowing later use even after proteins and healing tissue may have covered the ends of the guides. The guides are left in place and serve to mark the treated locations; retreatment, if necessary later, is facilitated since a capacitive-coupled RF catheter, for example, can be advanced adjacent to the guides and used to re-ablate the perivascular tissues in case any healing or reconstitution of the renal nerves has occurred.

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The invention is apparatus and methods for guiding RF energy through the renal artery to the perivascular nerves without thermal injury to the artery. A deployment catheter places a number of small conductive guides in the wall like rivets; the rivets have a good electrical conductor to pass RF or other electrical energy from a treatment catheter in the artery to a target zone outside the artery. The guides can have poorly conductive polymeric securement pads with a good conductor passing through the center, with an insulating outer layer to prevent energy passage directly into the artery wall along the guide. After securing a number of these energy guides, a treatment catheter delivers energy to the luminal end of the guides. The energy passes through the good conductor and passes into the perivascular tissue where renal nerves are located. The high current density ablates the renal nerves, while the artery tissue is largely unaffected. The treatment catheter can transmit energy to the guides by direct contact or by capacitive coupling, allowing later use even after proteins and healing tissue may have covered the ends of the guides. The guides are left in place and serve to mark the treated locations; retreatment, if necessary later, is facilitated since a capacitive-coupled RF catheter, for example, can be advanced adjacent to the guides and used to re-ablate the perivascular tissues in case any healing or reconstitution of the renal nerves has occurred.