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An Apparatus and Method for Storing Hardcopy Medical Images on Holographic Film Sheets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000201087D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Nov-08
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Nov-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

One of the basic components in most clinical imaging applications is the so called filming function. This function supports clinicians by enabling hardcopies of processed DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images and printouts with various image divisions. Such division can be for example a picture array of 1x1, 2x2 or 3x3 etc. To accommodate multiple images there is a need for multiple hardcopy film sheets. For example, to accommodate 20 images, five of the 2x2 film sheets are needed. By doing so the possibility of an excessive increasing in the number of film sheets exists. Currently, the number of film sheets is increased by decreasing the division and hence the number of images per sheet. In this case the size of the printed images would be diminished and so would the quality.

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An Apparatus and Method for Storing Hardcopy Medical Images on Holographic Film Sheets

Idea: Deepak Jah, IN-Bangalore

One of the basic components in most clinical imaging applications is the so called filming function. This function supports clinicians by enabling hardcopies of processed DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images and printouts with various image divisions. Such division can be for example a picture array of 1x1, 2x2 or 3x3 etc. To accommodate multiple images there is a need for multiple hardcopy film sheets. For example, to accommodate 20 images, five of the 2x2 film sheets are needed. By doing so the possibility of an excessive increasing in the number of film sheets exists.

Currently, the number of film sheets is increased by decreasing the division and hence the number of images per sheet. In this case the size of the printed images would be diminished and so would the quality.

A novel solution proposes the use of holographic imaging technology to store captured medical image based media. In this solution numerous images can be included on one film sheet by utilizing different visual depths across its surface. The images are burned on a special sheet by a holographic printer which is controlled by a special software program called ARIP (Automatic Real Image Printer). A Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) which is an electrically programmable device for modulating light encodes the image data into the signal beam that is then directed to the photosensitive optical media. For storing the information of each layer of image burned on the sheet, like luminosity and angle of incidence of the signal and reference beams corresponding to each image, and information like time and sequence of acquisition a vector table is used (Figure 2). This vector table contains the data structure which is stored in the holographic sheet as a bar code. Figure 1 shows the schematic of the proposed holographic image storage device.

To view the holographically stored images a display device is needed (Figure 3)...