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Duo Material Combined Receiver Tube and Suspension for Behind-The-Ear Hearing Aid

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000201635D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Nov-17
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Nov-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 136K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

In a Behind-The-Ear (BTE) hearing aid, the receiver tube and receiver suspension are always two separate rubber parts (see Figure 1). For acoustic reasons a harder material is needed for the receiver tube while a softer material is needed for the suspension of the receiver against vibration. Thus, a shock protection for the receiver is provided. It is a time consuming manual process to assemble the two parts. The rubber tube has to be plugged in and turned to adjust the tubes angle, and then the receiver suspension has to be slid into the desired position. An automated assembly of these parts is difficult. From past studies and experiments with real parts, the combination of receiver tube and suspension molded in one out of a single material will not fulfill the acoustic and vibration isolation requirements. Therefore, the receiver tube and the receiver’s suspension are separate parts and the assembly is done manually or otherwise an automated assembly has to be done separately for the two parts.

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Duo Material Combined Receiver Tube and Suspension for Behind-The-Ear Hearing Aid

Idea: Swee Kim Chua, SG-Singapore

In a Behind-The-Ear (BTE) hearing aid, the receiver tube and receiver suspension are always two separate rubber parts (see Figure 1). For acoustic reasons a harder material is needed for the receiver tube while a softer material is needed for the suspension of the receiver against vibration. Thus, a shock protection for the receiver is provided. It is a time consuming manual process to assemble the two parts. The rubber tube has to be plugged in and turned to adjust the tubes angle, and then the receiver suspension has to be slid into the desired position. An automated assembly of these parts is difficult. From past studies and experiments with real parts, the combination of receiver tube and suspension molded in one out of a single material will not fulfill the acoustic and vibration isolation requirements. Therefore, the receiver tube and the receiver's suspension are separate parts and the assembly is done manually or otherwise an automated assembly has to be done separately for the two parts.

In the following a novel construction is proposed where the receiver tube and the receiver suspension are made of two rubber materials with different mechanical properties molded in one single part (see Figure 2). The receiver tube angle is fi...