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Principle of Brake Energy Storage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202041D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Dec-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Dec-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 125K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Wind energy varies in intensity and continuity, from place to place, and from time to time. This results in an inequality of energy supply through the wind turbines. For example, wind turbines have to be shutdown, which means 100% loss of wind energy, in case of a long turbulence or less electric energy can be produced on less windy days or energy is produced in times of low energy needs and thereby low prices. In order to keep a nearly constant amount of energy supply and to guarantee a nearly constant price for turbine-supplied electricity, it is necessary to store energy in reasonable ways to achieve a compensable balance between needed energy and available energy. Further there is an economical aspect, which requires producing energy as much as possible, especially if there is need of the market. Thus it is important that a turbine produces energy as early and as long as possible. This means that it is beneficial if it is possible to lower the cut-in and to enlarge the cut-off wind speed of a turbine.

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Principle of Brake Energy Storage

Idea: Ying Li, DE-Aachen; Dr. Brice Tchemtchoua, DE-Aachen; Cong Nguyen, DE-Aachen; Klaus

Ventzke, DE-Aachen; Peter Schneider, DE-Aachen; Dr. Andreas Hohle, DE-Aachen

Wind energy varies in intensity and continuity, from place to place, and from time to time. This results

in an inequality of energy supply through the wind turbines. For example, wind turbines have to be

shutdown, which means 100% loss of wind energy, in case of a long turbulence or less electric energy

can be produced on less windy days or energy is produced in times of low energy needs and thereby

low prices. In order to keep a nearly constant amount of energy supply and to guarantee a nearly

constant price for turbine-supplied electricity, it is necessary to store energy in reasonable ways to

achieve a compensable balance between needed energy and available energy.

Further there is an economical aspect, which requires producing energy as much as possible,

especially if there is need of the market. Thus it is important that a turbine produces energy as early

and as long as possible. This means that it is beneficial if it is possible to lower the cut-in and to

enlarge the cut-off wind speed of a turbine.

Up to today there are different concepts under investigation to store power hydraulically, pneumatically

or kinetically. All these concepts work separately from the turbine itself. But no concept integrates the

storage into the turbine directly. Further none of these systems is used to influence the cut-in and cut- off wind speed of a turbine.

A novel proposed solution provides for local storing of energy and using the stored energy. The novel

procedure uses existing methods for storing energy by converting electrical or mechanical energy into

hydraulic or pneumatic energy. Figure 1 shows the principle of storing hydraulic or pneumatic energy

by using a pump as brake. The pump is used in times of high wind speed when usually the turbine is

shut down. By using the pump in parallel to the original drive train the turbine still can produce energy,

while the components of the drive train are still loaded under nominal conditions.

By driving the pump as motor, the stored energy can be used in start-up phases for driving or

supporting the rotor. In start-up phases of current wind turbines the generator is acting as driver and is

consuming power until a certain rotational speed is reached and energy can be produced. Hence, on

the one hand the stored pneumatic or hydraulic energy can be used to drive the turbine, instead of

using power from the grid. But on the other hand, it is also possible to support the rotor by the pump

and to start power production at wind speeds, which are belo...